Tagged: music

Kermit, Ricky Gervais Begin Shooting The Muppets…Again!

The-Muppets-Again_450BURBANK, Calif. (January 30, 2013) – The filmmaking team behind 2011’s celebrated film The Muppets reunites as Disney’s The Muppets … Again! kicked off production last week in London. The all-new global Muppets adventure welcomes Ricky Gervais, Ty Burrell and Tina Fey to the mayhem, along with Kermit the Frog, Miss Piggy, Walter and rest of the Muppets. The film is directed by James Bobin (Flight of the Conchords, Da Ali G Show), who was just nominated for a BAFTA for The Muppets (Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer), and produced by the Academy Award®-nominated team of David Hoberman and Todd Lieberman (The Fighter, The Proposal). With a screenplay by Bobin and Nicholas Stoller (The Five-Year Engagement), who is also executive producer with John Scotti, The Muppets … Again! will feature music from Academy Award®-winning songwriter Bret McKenzie (Flight of the Conchords), who won an Oscar® for best original song for “The Muppets” (“Man or Muppet”). The new film will hit the big screen March 21, 2014.

“It’s great to be back working with the Muppets,” said Bobin, “some of them even remember my name occasionally now. As for the movie, it’s a tip of the hat to the old-school crime capers of the ’60s, but featuring a frog, a pig, a bear and a dog—no panthers, even pink ones—along with the usual Muppet-y mix of mayhem, music and laughs.”

Disney’s The Muppets … Again! takes the entire Muppets gang on a global tour, selling out grand theaters in some of Europe’s most exciting destinations, including Berlin, Madrid and London. But mayhem follows the Muppets overseas, as they find themselves unwittingly entangled in an international crime caper headed by Constantine—the World’s Number One Criminal and a dead ringer for Kermit—and his dastardly sidekick Dominic, aka Number Two, portrayed by Ricky Gervais, creator of “Derek” and the Golden Globe®- and Emmy®-winning series The Office and Extras. The film stars Golden Globe-, Emmy- and SAG Award®-winning actress and writer Tina Fey (30 Rock, Mean Girls, Date Night) as Nadya, a feisty prison guard, and Emmy Award winner Ty Burrell (Modern Family) as Interpol agent Jean Pierre Napoleon.

Said Kermit the Frog, “This movie takes us places we’ve never been before. And trust me—this frog has never seen so much international flavor. I think audiences will eat it up—the entertainment, that is.”

Featuring a slew of surprising celebrity cameos, Disney’s The Muppets … Again! will shoot on location in London and in Hollywood, as well as in the famed Pinewood Studios in Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, just outside of London.

Emily S. Whitten: Geeklitism – Part I

Whitten Art 130108I think tomorrow I’ll call up Merriam-Webster and suggest a new word for their dictionary. That word? Geeklitism. (Not to be confused with Geekleetist, which posts fun stuff).

It should be in the dictionary, because it certainly is a thing that exists. But how would I suggest they define it? Damned if I know, although I guess the short version could be: “claiming you’re a ‘real geek’ and other people aren’t; claiming you’re the superior geek.” But really, the various aspects of both this attitude and of being a “geek” generally are so broad that I’m not sure they can be encompassed in a dictionary definition.

The reason for this, and the funny thing about “being a geek,” is that it’s a different experience for everyone. For instance, I’ve been a geek probably all of my life; but I don’t know that I ever really knew it until adulthood, when, thanks to the increased ease of finding like-minded people via the internet, it suddenly turned out it wasn’t such a bad thing to be. As far as I recall, no one called me a geek growing up. I had no idea I was part of this mysterious group of people called “geeks.”

“What??” I can hear a geeklitist out there crying out in triumph. “No one called you a geek? That must mean that you didn’t get bullied by the “cool kids” in school! Haha! You can’t understand the suffering and hardships that I went through in my formative years because of my love of stories about hobbits! You are not a real geek like me!” (This is the kind of thing geeklitists say, don’t you know. Sometimes they also add, “And all the girls made fun of me!! I’ve never gotten over that! My life was so hard!”)

But that’s not really what I said, is it? Of course I got picked on. Most kids do. For instance, when I was in first grade and all the cool kids in my new school had moved on to jeans or whatever was in fashion, my mom, bless her, still dressed me in cutesy pastel sweatsuits with big decorative (but pointless) buttons and bows on them. It follows that one of my first memories of my new school is three girls in my class making fun of my clothes on the playground – at which point I probably said something mean.

I was a well-read little child, who could creatively insult other children with words that none of us really knew the meaning of; but they sounded like insults, so it all worked out. For example, at some point in my primary school years, one of the biggest insults I remember using was, “You’re corroded!” (Which makes no sense under the real definition but sounds like maybe you have a gross skin condition?) My favorite of the weird words I personally transmogrified into an insult when young was “You’re a transubstantiationalist!” No one else had any idea what it meant, but I managed to convince the kids I was using it on that it was a really horrible thing to be. Mwahaha. But I digress. Anyway, at that point, we all got in a fight. Like a physical fight, of the kicking and punching and hair and decorative bow-pulling variety. Yowch.

“Whatever!” the geeklitist is saying. “That’s not what I meant. That’s just fashion. You were only a geek if you were ostracized because of your offbeat hobbies and/or love of genre fiction as a child! That’s what makes you a real geek like me.” Well, yes. I was that, too. I used to sit by myself at lunch and read giant books that were too “old” for me, like Clan of the Cave Bear and The Mists of Avalon, propped up in front of me as I ate with painful slowness (something else for which I was occasionally teased, but which turns out to be the healthy way to eat. Take that!). I’d walk down the school halls reading A Swiftly Tilting Planet or maybe The Deed of Paksenarrion without looking up (during which I developed a great sixth sense for not running into people while looking down, which is very handy these days when texting while walking to work).

I was definitely called weird, and often, annoying (because I used big words and talked a lot) more times than I can count. I engaged in some geek activities that probably would have been thought cool by at least the little boys in my class, like watching Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and X-Men cartoons, but I never realized that, because at that point in my life, boys had cooties. (Of course.) I’m not saying I didn’t have friends; I did, and they were a lot of fun. But I also got made fun of; and as far as I knew, most of my friends were not actually interested in The Lord of the Rings or Batman: The Animated Series. I don’t even know that I ever thought to ask most of them.(Or if I did, and received blank stares, I probably never brought it up again. This is why I’d never make a good Whedonvangelist, another word I’ve decided should be in the dictionary.)

Those were the sorts of things I often enjoyed alone, and didn’t really talk about that much, and that was fine. I knew (from others telling me, repeatedly) that I was a weird child, and I guess I just kind of assumed that was how life was and would continue to be for me – having some interests that nobody around me shared. Of course, that feeling of being alone in one’s interests is often cited as part of the experience of geekdom; and of course, in truth, lots of other people also had those interests; I just hadn’t discovered them yet. But I guess that’s all part of being a geek.

“Ahaha!” an entirely different brand of geeklitist is chortling. “But none of that matters! That’s just kid stuff! You’re not a real geek like me unless you can list, right this minute, in reverse alphabetical order, every superhero who turned out to be a Skrull during Secret Invasion! And until you can name at least three obscure continuity errors in [my favorite comics character’s] ongoing storyline! And unless you can tell me your three favorite fighting tactics for the video game character whose costume you are now wearing!” But, second brand of geeklitist…the water is wide, and the world is large, and I might like a different character than you do, or I might focus on something for different reasons than you do. Are you saying your viewpoint and favorite genre things and factoids are inherently better and geekier than mine, and are the only things that can bestow upon all of us admission into the uber-exclusive society of geekdom, just because they are yours? …Well, yes, yes you are, and that’s pretty self-centered. We can all be geeks in our own ways, with our own specific areas of interest and knowledge. Right?

“No no,” chides another, lone geeklitist, standing apart with one brow raised and pointing a finger at each of us in turn. “You will never, ever be a real geek, because you didn’t watch Firefly until it came out on DVD! You only like the newest Doctor Who! You never participated in the drive to keep Chuck on the air via purchasing mounds of Subway sandwiches. You’ll never be a real geek, not any of you, because (cue dramatic music and Iwo Jima flag-raising reenactment) I was here first, and I claim this geekdom in the name of Geekmoria! It’s mine, all miiiiine!!!!!

…What? No, really, what? That’s just asinine.

“…”

“…”

“Well…maybe,” says the lone geeklitist doubtfully. “But I was here first.”

How do you know, lone geeklitist? Did you turn on your TV to a new show before anyone else in the entire world? Acquire an ARC of the first book in a now-beloved series? Hold in your excited hands the very first copy of the very first appearance of a comic book character? And even if you did…why does that give you any more claim to an appreciation of it than anyone else? Why does timing somehow make you more passionate about your geekdom than all the other geeks?

“…?”

Exactly.

So, any other geeklitists out there want to make a stand about how they’re the real geeks? I just ask because I don’t like to exclude people, although I realize the irony of saying that to you, geeklitists.

I’m hearing a lot of silence out there. Guess I’ll just wrap this u–what? I’m sorry? What did you say?

A chorus of low, angry, guttural voices rises from the deep to repeat itself, as one last group of geeklitists has its say:

You can’t be a real geek! You’re a girrrrrrrl!!

Oh, seriously. Shut up already.

And until next time, Servo Lectio!

TUESDAY AFTERNOON: Michael Davis Rises!

WEDNESDAY MORNING: Mike Gold Laughs!

 

Martha Thomases: You Say You Want A Resolution…

Thomases Art 130104New Year’s Resolutions aren’t for me. When I was a kid, my parents would sit my sister and me down with paper and have us write some. I suppose it helped their hangovers. Since I had to do it, I hated it.

For most of the last decade, my only resolution has been to drink more water. If that.

Still, there is a new year ahead, and that means twelve months of possibilities. It would be foolish not to have a plan to take advantage of them. So here, for better or worse, is what I want to do. We’ll see if I have the resolve to follow through.

• Try new things. When I go to the comic book store on Wednesday morning (hi, gang!), it’s easy to just pick up my usual. But just as that’s a boring way to go to a restaurant when there are so many other choices, it’s no way to approach the rack. Last year, for one example, I took great joy in Resident Alien. If you didn’t see it, I highly recommend the trade. As for me, I’m going to look for more than a DC bullet in the corner.

• Don’t support what I don’t like. As I said above, I have a tendency to just look for the DC bullet. And while I’ve expanded my repertoire over the decades I’ve read comics, I tend to add titles more than subtract them. Why do I do this? Am I afraid I’ll miss something? The Internet means I can always catch up. In the meantime, I’ll save myself time, money, and indicate my displeasure to publishers.

• Proselytize. When something is good, I’ll say so, especially if that thing isn’t getting enough attention. For example, American Horror Story: Asylum  is the best television show I never hear anybody talking about. It has everything you could want in an entertainment – Nazi doctors, serial killers, demon-possessed nuns, crusading lesbian reporters, aliens from outer space – and it’s from the guys who bring you Glee, so you know everybody looks good.

• Shut up, occasionally. It’s easy for us Baby Boomers to talk incessantly about how much better we had it, back when rent was cheap, there was no HIV, and there were no rating systems. We had great movies, great comics and music that still moves us. But most of us forgot our ideals, and sold out our legacy. Patti Smith is doing Levi ads. We are in no position to tell younger people what to do.

It’s my fondest hope that I can stick to these, at least through Groundhog Day. And to keep my water bottle handy.

SATURDAY: Marc Alan Fishman

 

Martha Thomases: Printing Punk

Like many old people, New Year’s Eve makes me remember earlier times. When I was young. When I knew who the new bands were. When I was cool. Once one has children, one is never cool again.

There was a period of time in the mid-1970s when I dropped out of college and went to work for an antiwar magazine. We had a barter arrangement with lots of underground newspapers and magazines, so I got to read CREEM magazine, and from that and the Village Voice, I knew who all the cool bands were and where to see them in New York.

When I decided to go back to college for my degree, I kept up subscriptions to CREEM and the Voice, and it was from these that I discovered Punk.

Not the music, although also the music. No, I mean Punk, a magazine that combined my two greatest passions, comics and rock’n’roll.  It was hand-lettered. It was rude and crude and hilarious. I so wanted to work there.

After I graduated, I moved to Manhattan and tried to get a job in journalism. I applied at straight places, like Time-Life, Condé Nast and Hearst. And I walked into the PUNK office, then on Tenth Avenue, to see if they would hire me. When I said I had worked for an antiwar magazine, Legs McNeil, the Resident Punk, leaped on top of a desk, pointed at me, and yelled that I was a Commie.

That didn’t stop them from letting me do some typing for them, when they needed labels for a mailing. And it didn’t stop me from becoming friends with Legs and John Holmstrom, the editor.

John is, in my opinion, the most ripped-off man in comics. I mean, lots of early comic book creators were screwed financially by their publishers. And lots of early comic book creators have been imitated by the artists who followed them. John, however, created a style that was part Harvey Kurtzman (a mentor of his), part Bazooka Joe, part Basil Wolverton, but uniquely his own. In no time at all, and with not even an acknowledgement or thanks, he was co-opted by every art director at every publisher and every ad agency in the world.

But John was more than an innovator. He was a great patron of new talent. Not only did Punk do stories on new bands, but they published work by new cartoonists. For example, John was one of the first person to publish Peter Bagge.

It has long been my contention that the comics and rock’n’roll share the characteristics that both are uniquely American art forms, but only gained respect when English people did them. John combined them in astonishingly simple ways, by drawing his interviews, or staging fumetti stories that starred Richard Hell, Debbie Harry, the Ramones and Andy Warhol, among others.

It’s not just nostalgia at Auld Lang Syne that has me thinking about how cool Punk was. Harper Collins has just published a big, beautiful hard cover volume, The Best of Punk Magazine that brings those late 1970s/early 1980s days back to life. It’s on much slicker paper than the original, but it still has the brattiness that made the original so much fun.

It’s a book that will get up on a desk and yell at you, and then bum money for cigarettes and beer.

SATURDAY: Marc Alan Fishman’s… Lists

 

DOC SAVAGE IS COMING TO THANKSGIVING DINNER

Well, at least in book form. The Big Book of Bronze #5 goes on sale November 23.

Press Release:

The Big Book of Bronze #5 will be released November 23rd on Lulu.com. At 282 pages, this tome of Doc Savage information, by the leading Doc Savage authorities of our time, holds insights into the Man of Bronze that you will be thrilled to read and ponder. In addition to the documentation of Doc Savage musings, you will find the must have companion to the new Jazz CD (Bronze Nemesis) by Scott Robinson about the music and his meeting with James Bama, the Ron Ely interview conducted in September where Ron discusses the movie in detail with Steve Ringgenberg, the detailed reflections of a meeting with Norma Dent by Dean Russell and an article by the current Kenneth Robeson: Will Murray.

Check out the great Doc Savage reading below and order your books in time for Christmas!

WHO IS FRED FORINO? by William Lampkin
HIS NAME WAS DOC SAVAGE by Fred Forino
WHO IS JACK JUKA? by Joe DeVito
COLLECTING ORIGINAL DOC SAVAGE ART by Jack Juka
WHO IS JAY RYAN? by Terry Allen
A GLEAMING SPIKE OF STEAL AND BRICK by Jay Ryan
THE RED DEATH’S ELEPHANT GUN by Jay Ryan
A FLOOR BY ANY OTHER NAME… by Jay Ryan
BULLETS OVER BROADWAY by Jay Ryan
WHO IS JEFF DEISCHER?
COMING DOWN OUT OF THE TREES by Jeff Deischer
WHO IS STEVE DONOSO?
THE BRONZE ARCHIVE by Steve Donoso
WHO IS MATT HIEBERT? by Lokke Heiss
FOUNDATIONS FOR DOC SAVAGE’S PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT by Matt Hiebert
WHO IS JULIAN PUGA?
THE LAST REGISTERED DOC SAVAGE ADVENTURE by Julián Puga
WHO IS DAFYDD NEAL DYAR? by Allyson Dyar
DOC SAVAGE AND THE WORLD OF TOMORROW by Dafydd Neal Dyar
WHO IS COURTNEY ROGERS? by Pat Lilja
THE MYSTERY OF THE DOUBLE-USE PFEIFFER COVER by Courtney Rogers
WHO IS DEAN RUSSELL? by Jay Ryan
REFLECTING ON NORMA DENT by Dean Russell
WHO IS WILL MURRAY? by Matt Moring
MAN OF MIGHT by Will Murray
WHO IS SCOTT CRANFORD? by Wayne Skiver
THE ADVENTURES OF A BRONZE PAINTING by Scott Cranford
WHO IS JIM COX?
DOC SAVAGE AND THE ASIAN MARTIAL ARTS by Jim Cox
WHO IS RICK LAI? by Art Sippo
DOC SAVAGE AND THE CAGLIOSTRO LEGACY by Rick Lai
FIRST SIGHTING (Part Two) by Fred Forino
FIRST SIGHTING (Part Three) by Fred Forino
WHO IS DUANE SPURLOCK? by Chuck Welch
DENT’S HARD BOILED DOC: SATAN BLACK by Duane Spurlock
WHO IS TIM FAUROTE? by Bert Ehrmann
DOC SAVAGE: THE MAN OF…PLASTIC by Tim Faurote
WHO IS ARTHUR C. SIPPO MD, MPH? by Rick Lai
DOC’S LEGAL AIDE: AN APPRECIATION OF HAM BROOKS, ESQUIRE by Art Sippo
WHO IS SCOTT ROBINSON? by Michael Steinman
BRONZE NEMESIS: THE MAKING OF A MUSICAL ADVENTURE by Scott Robinson
WHO IS STEVE RINGGENBERG?
DOC SAVAGE SPEAKS: RON ELY! by Steve Ringgenberg

Learn more about The Big Book of Bronze series here.

SANTA GETS PULPED!

Cover Art: Mark Maddox

2011 Rondo Artist of the Year, and New Pulp artist, Mark Maddox has illustrated the cover for the Christmas 2012 issue of Diabolique magazine in stores this November.

From the press release: The cover painting is by the brilliant Mark Maddox. And a very special thanks to Spring Wolf D.D., Ph.D. for writing a superb cover article for us on the dark origins of Santa Claus.

About Diabolique Magazine:
Diabolique is a lavishly illustrated, bimonthly print and digital magazine that explores all aspects of the horror genre, including film, theatre, literature, music, history and the arts, bringing fresh perspective and analysis to subjects old and new, from ancient folklore and Gothic classics to contemporary film releases and modern literary gems. Each issue brims with insightful commentary, criticism, and engrossing information complemented by photos, illustrations and handsome, full-color design. Past issues have included contributors from such horror luminaries as Jonathan Rigby, David Del Valle, David Huckvale, Paul Murray, and Elizabeth Miller. Diabolique is edited by Scott Feinblatt and Brandon Kosters.

Visit Diabolique on-line at www.diaboliquemagazine.com and on Facebook.

BROTHER BONES SPEAKS AGAIN ON AUDIO!

PRESS RELEASE
BROTHER BONES AUDIO  #2

Airship 27 Productions and Dynamic Ram Audio are very, very happy to announce the release of the second Brother Bones audio pulp adventure as read by Mark Kalita with production by Sound Engineer Chris Barnes.
Following the successful release of the origin story, “The Bone Brothers,” this second story, of the seven that appeared in Airship 27 Productions’ book BROTHER BONES – THE UNDEAD AVENGER, is titled “Shield and Claw,” and has the grim hero of Port Noir battling a savage werewolf in a fast paced, melodramatics audio experience.
“Once again, voice actor Mark Kalita provides the chills,” Airship 27 Managing Editor Ron Fortier applauds enthusiastically.  “His reading pulls the listener along like a runaway freight train and Chris adds the proper mood music and effects to properly heighten the suspense.”
Airship 27 Production is selling each of the original stories individually for $2 each as mp3 downloads from their website.  After all seven have been produced and released individually, the entire book audio package will go on sale for $9.99, a $4 savings.
Art Director Rob Davis has provided cover images from the illustrations he drew for each story.   SHIELD AND CLAW is an audio pulp written by Ron Fortier and read by Mark Kalita is now on sale and is the perfect “treat” for this Halloween season.
We are also in the process of putting out a brand new edition of the book that will soon be available on Create Space, Amazon, Indy Planet and Kindle.

PRO SE ANNOUNCES NEW DIGEST SERIES FEATURING CHARACTERS OF CLASSIC PULP AUTHOR!

Pro Se, a growing Publisher specializing in Heroic Fiction, New Pulp, and tales covering multiple genres, announced an open call today for a new series of books from Pro Se that mark the collaboration between the New Pulp Publisher and a classic Pulp Author!

Charles Boeckman, a 91 year old author/world traveler/jazz musician recently self published SUSPENSE, SUSPICION, & SHOCKERS.  This collection of 24 stories was written by Boeckman, many of them under the name Charles Beckman,  Jr. and were printed in Pulps such as Dime Detective, Detective Tales, Dime Mystery, and others as well as in digest mystery magazines such as Manhunt and Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine.  With a career ranging from the 40s into the modern era in fiction, much of it crime and mystery related, Boeckman is truly one of the last remaining true Pulp Authors today and has crafted characters that, although they only appeared once originally, have potential for further adventures, a potential Pro Se Productions plans to tap.

“This book,” Tommy Hancock, Editor in Chief and Partner in Pro Se, states, “is truly a fantastic read.  Mr. Boeckman’s words sing with the huskiness and weight of a torch singer and the stories deliver blows like gunshots from all sides.   He breathes life into every character, every locale, and every situation these hard luck heroes find themselves in.  And one of the great things about his stories is, although there are definitely heroes between the beginning and end, they’re not cast in bronze or refined from gold.   These are bruised, battered, often broken souls who have talents for music, in a lot of cases, or mystery and are almost as talented in getting themselves in trouble that most people would have to die to get out of.”

“After reading his book,” Hancock continues, “I contacted Mr. Boeckman and, following drowning him in compliments and fanboy like sentiments, I identified several characters that I felt like could have life in new stories and would appeal to a modern audience, both for nostalgic reasons as well as the fact that these characters, even the ones written back in the 1940s, were definitely written with a sensibility that makes them viable to modern readers.  I requested the permission to put together anthologies and books based around these characters in a series of digests that sport Mr. Boeckman’s name and he agreed to that.”

Pro Se will begin publishing the CHARLES BOECKMAN PRESENTS line of digest sized anthologies and novellas featuring characters originally created and featured in stories written by Boeckman.  Although each individual digest may focus on a different theme or character, they will all appear under the CBP banner, and will feature new stories based on Boeckman’s work.

Charles Boeckman

“This is an open call,” Hancock states, “to any and all writers who might be interested in trying their hand at Mr. Boeckman’s characters.  The first step in this process will be for interested writers to look over the brief descriptions of the characters provided and email proseproductions@earthlink.net with any and all they may be interested in.  Based on that interest, story bibles and other information will be sent to interested authors who will then be required to draft a proposal for a story, length being minimum 8,000 words to a full novella length of 30,000.  The proposal must be no more than a page long and, if the writer has never submitted to Pro Se before, a writing sample of at least 3 pages of narrative must be supplied as well. One thing to note, also.  Although these characters were originally created by Mr. Boeckman and  Pro Se will be insuring that they remain true to the source material, we are not wanting any writer to ape or copy Mr. Boeckman’s style.  We will be great stewards of these classic ideas as well as the skills and styles of the modern writers pouring life into them.”

Charles Boeckman

Detective Mercer Basous from ‘The G-String Corpse’- A homely 1970s New Orleans Detective who knows three things very well- New Orleans, the people that make it up, and how to do his job.

Big Lip from ‘The Last Trumpet’-A piano player on1950s Broadway who solved the murder of his great friend and one of the greatest horn players the world has ever known who moves onto further tales and adventures in a band in a world without The Earl.

Buddy Gardner and Frank Judson from ‘Blind Date’- Frank, a mid 1960s small town reporter, and Buddy, a deputy in the small town with detective skills to spare, find new stories and cases to follow and crack in Kingsbury after their initial tale, where Frank finds a dead woman in his trunk that all evidence said he had an affair with, then murdered, but he’d never met her before.

Lt. Mike O’Shean and Lil Brown of the Daily Herald from “I’ll Make The Arrest”-Mike O’Shean, a passionate two fisted cop  of the early 1950s who sinks his teeth into a case and won’t let go, even if it kills him, and Lil Brown, the reporter who knows her job and city better than anyone…and knows O’Shean better than that.   These two are at the beginning of what may be a beautiful relationship if crime and corruption don’t get in the way!

Doc and Sally from ‘A Hot Lick for Doc’-Fresh in 1950s LA from their debut tale, Doc, a washed up clarinet player who found his music again following being involved and solving a murder, and Sally, the recovering heroin addict who accompanied him, would be ready to write new tunes and chop a new life out of whatever life and LA throws at them.

Johnny Nickle from ‘Run, Cat, Run’-A trumpet player who’s claim to fame was having played on a supposedly haunted Jazz Classic that led to him being on the run from a curse and a murderer for years, Johnny Nickle is now back on top in the early 1950s blowing his horn and finding trouble almost everywhere he finds a stage to stand on.

The stories will be set in the periods mentioned for each of the characters.  If a writer wishes to go beyond that period, then that must be clearly mentioned in the proposal.

Deadline for initial proposal submissions is November 1st, 2012.  

Other characters from Mr. Boeckman’s many stories may be added to the available list to write from at a later date, Hancock points out, but these are currently the only characters discussed thus far.

“This,” Hancock says, “is not only a great opportunity for Pro Se, but it is truly an honor to have not only made the acquaintance of such a great writer and part of Pulp history as Mr. Boeckman, but to have the privilege of giving new life to these classic friends of his, there’s no real words for that except We intend to make him proud.”  

For more information on Pro Se Productions, go to www.prosepulp.com.  To get a copy of SUSPENSE, SUSPICIONS, AND SHOCKERS go to http://www.amazon.com/Suspense-Suspicion-Shockers-Charles-Boeckman/dp/1479238732/ref=sr_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1350269187&sr=1-6.

DOUBLE HEADER REVIEW-CLASSIC PULP AUTHOR’S COLLECTION A MUST HAVE!

ALL PULP REVIEWS by Ron Fortier
SUSPENSE, SUSPICION & SHOCKERS
By Charles Beckman Jr.
Von Boeckman Fiction Factory Publications
ISBN # 9781479238736
265 pgs.
Several months ago I received an e-mail from a woman named Patti Boeckman. She told me her husband, Charles Boeckman, for most of his life had been a professional pulp writer working in the 40s and 50s under the name of Charles Beckmen.  Between 1945 through to 1975 his short crime stories had appeared in such pulp magazines as Dime Detective, All-Story Detective, Manhunt, Detective Tales to name just a few leading up to many sales in 60s and 70s to Alfred Hitchock’s Mystery Magazine.

A native of Texas, raised during the Great Depression, Charles had two loves; writing and music.  He became a success in both fields.  He taught himself to play saxophone and clarinet and during his travels throughout the south from Texas to Florida he often played with many reputable jazz bands until he formed his own.  In 1990, he earned a star in the South Texas Music Walk of Fame and his band to this day still plays in October Texas Jazz Festival.
What Charles and Patti were unaware of until recently was the resurgence in pulp fiction brought about via the internet which allowed life-long fans and newcomers to come together and begin creating forums to share their love of this escapist literary genre.  Patti, a former school teacher, discovered all this accidently while surfing the web and began to dig deeper into this wonderful phenomenon which invariable led her to the New Pulp Fiction movement.  A smart lady, she jotted down names and e-mail addresses and methodically reached out to many of these “new” pulp enthusiasts and that was how her letter of introduction popped up in my e-mail box.
At that time Patti and Charles were considering collecting many of his crime stories and self-publishing a book.  Hearing this, I, and many of my colleagues, encouraged them to pursue this plan.  The idea of a new collection of authentic pulp tales produced by the actual writer was too good a dream to let slip away.  Then after a few months, Patti wrote again.  This time with the news that they had gone and achieved their objective and the result was this book, “Supsense, Suspicions & Shockers,” by Charles Beckman Jr.  She asked if I would like a copy to review.  That had to be the easiest question I’ve ever answered in my life.
This book, which sports a truly gorgeous cover by amazing Laura Givens, is crammed with twenty-four stories; every single one of them a dazzling display of originality and deft story-telling technique.  Like the finest writers of the pulp era, Beckman had a keen, unerring grasp of human psychology and he employed it like a skillful surgeon carving up plot twists that turn on a time and more often than not, leave the reader both surprised and delighted.  No easy feat.  At the same time, because the book is so packed with stories, a true sense of the times emerges from the pages enveloping the reader taking them on a nostalgic journey back to an American landscape that can only be remembered in such pieces.  And throughout, Beckman’s background in music, especially the vibrancy of New Orleans jazz, is often the spiritual background to his cautionary yarns about desperate men and women struggling to survive in a bleak and desolate world.
Here is a sniveling coward bitten by a rattlesnake facing his own demise with joy, a walking dead man with a hole in his head, a musician being hunted by death itself, a cop after the punk who killed his wife and a husband who believes his devoted wife is about to murder him for absolutely no other reason than to simply do him in.  These are a small sampling of the unique characters that populate Charles Beckman’s fiction and once you’ve met them, I doubt seriously you will ever forget them.  There is a true humanity to these tales that seeks to uncover the good in even the worst of people and thus leaves the reader with a poignant optimistic hope for the future.  
“Suspense, Suspicion & Shockers,” is a genuine treasure trove of great pulp fiction by one of the best writers to ever tap his fingers over the keys of a mechanical typewriter.  There was magic in those fingers and it awaits you in this book.
PS – My copy arrived autographed.
TIPPIN’ HANCOCK’S HAT-Reviews of All Things Pulp by Tommy Hancock
SUSPENSE, SUSPICION & SHOCKERS
By Charles Beckman Jr.
Von Boeckman Fiction Factory Publications
 Every time I sit down to read a story with the New Pulp label attached to it or one that I just categorize as New Pulp, there’s always a thought that runs through my head.  How will it measure up, I ask myself, to those who came before…those who left us the legacy of Pulp?  When I write, that judgment is even harsher?  Even though I’m not necessarily trying to emulate Dent, Gibson, and the others who made Pulp what it was to me as a young fan, I do, as I put words to paper, think about the Pulp masters who came before…
And now, there’s a new name that’ll be added to that list every time I do it.
Charles Boeckman.
SUSPENSE, SUSPICION, & SHOCKERS is a book published by Boeckman, with assistance from his wife Patti, containing stories ranging from 1945 to 1975, tales that saw printed life in Pulp magazines and digest mags like Alfred Hitchcock, one even being picked up by Screen Gems for a television show.   Billed often as Charles Beckman Jr., this now 91 year old author recently learned that there were still indeed readers and fans, not to mention creators, who collected, discussed, and found inspiration in the Pulp tales of the Past.   Tales just like the 24 he wrote that make up this collection.
Boeckman’s work appeared in a who’s who of classic magazines- Alfred Hitchcock, All- Story Detective, Pursuit, Detective Tales, Dime Detective, Manhunt, and more.  Just as varied as the titles carrying his tales are the stories themselves-ranging from horror to crime to straight mystery to music inspired mayhem.   Drawing on his background as a jazz musician as well as his love for traveling, the author carries his readers through the back alleys of Corpus Christi, down the blues filled streets of New Orleans, to the arid land of Texas, and all around the country, following gangsters, murderers, molls, and ne’er do wells on their way.
Boeckman writes with a starkness, a reality, that wasn’t present very much in the work of most of his contemporaries.  His characters are flawed, many addicted to something, be it marijuana or music, and they make mistakes.   Boeckman also, however, reflects the one wonderful aspect all humanity shares.   That even in the darkest hour, when all hope is lost, a blackened soul might just reach out for the light and do one good thing in an otherwise worthless life.  Simultaneously, Boeckman’s work is dark and moody while also being hopeful and even at times, when you look really hard in the shadows for it, light hearted. 
Another appealing aspect of Boeckman’s SUSPENSE, SUSPICION, & SHOCKERS is the characters themselves.   With all the reading I do of both new and classic stories, I find many I enjoy, but not so many that truly inspire, that make me want to read more of what doesn’t exist, to up my game in ways I can’t understand.   When you meet Boeckman’s Big Lip, Johnny Nickle, Michael OShean, and other citizens that populate this fantastic collection, you’ll know what I mean, especially if you’re an avid Pulp fan and/or creator. 
FIVE OUT FIVE TIPS OF THE HAT- SUSPENSE, SUSPICION, & SHOCKERS by Charles Boeckman, often billed as Charles Beckman, Jr. and published by Boeckman and his wife is a must have for any true Pulp fan…or Crime Fan…or anyone who can read.  Definitely in the top three of books I’ve ever tipped my hat to.