Tagged: music

Price Performs At Ammons Benefit

Price Performs At Ammons Benefit

If you happen to be in Chicago this coming Saturday (September 22nd), you can watch and hear musician and ComicMix writer Michael H. Price along with a legion of music stalwarts in tribute to Albert Ammons, one of the very best boogie-woogie pianists.  But I’ll let his granddaughter Lila give you the low-down:

"Albert Ammons was a gifted musician who helped spark the boogie-woogie craze and whose music has influenced such greats as Dr. John, Axel Zwingenberger, Hadda Brooks, and Dave Alexander. He was also my grandfather. This year marks the one-hundredth anniversary of his birth. Please join me, and a constellation of stellar performers, as we celebrate the life and music of this extraordinary artist." The event is being held at the Chicago Temple at 4:00 PM Saturday. Quite frankly, the $25.00 ticket price is worth it just to appreciate the venue’s awesome architecture. And it ‘s in the heart of the Chicago Loop overlooking Daley Plaza, site of the penultimate scene from The Blues Brothers – the one where the cops scale the County Building walls.

If you’re a blue, jazz, roots and/or rock fan, this is the place for you. For more information, check out their website. It’s gonna be kickin’.

Happy birthday, MTV!

Happy birthday, MTV!

Twenty six years ago this very second, with the launching of a space rocket and a moon landing with a funky flag, MTV launched into the homes of a half million cable subscribers. (For the youngsters in the audience, MTV stood for "Music Television" and they would actually play music videos 24 hours a day.)

So… ladies and gentlemen, rock and roll:

And of course, the first music video played on MTV. C’mon, sing along– you know the words:

Big ComicMix Broadcast: The Trouble With Harry

Big ComicMix Broadcast: The Trouble With Harry

We break up another sticky week with a Big ComicMix Broadcast filled with Pop Culture breezes: Harry Potter is in the theaters and we review the film, plus news on stuff being dumped on your TV this summer, who is talking for Hellboy, some cheap gaming options online AND another step in our Countdown To the San Diego ComicCon plus something from three girls who broke a few music theory rules and used the idea to cash in on the pop charts.

Press The Button before the kid playing HARRY gets any older!

Happy 60th Anniversary to the Flying Saucer

Happy 60th Anniversary to the Flying Saucer

On this day sixty years ago, reports came  from the Roswell Army Air Field that a "flying disc" had been recovered from a nearby ranch, and an industry was born.

Since then, we’ve had books, movies, TV shows, comic books, and rock and roll music all discussing whatever happened at Roswell with varying degrees of fictionality and believability. And just remember that it all started with a crashed– sorry, we’d like to tell you, but you’re not really cleared for that.

Garth Ennis Talks To ComicMix

Garth Ennis Talks To ComicMix

The new week means a new Big ComicMix Broadcast of course, flanked by our regular Tuesday look at the newest comics and DVDs, plus news on Marvel’s Big Con announcements and we talk to Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson about how they brought The Boys back bigger than ever. Top it all off with a visit from one of the most beloved ladies in soul music, and you got 13 minutes of pop culture bliss!!

Press The Button or we will have to tell Garth. Trust us – you DON’T want us to tell Garth!

What kind of car would The Punisher drive?

What kind of car would The Punisher drive?

Did the survivors of Heroes save themselves – to the viewers? The Big ComicMix Broadcast digs into that while it’s all fresh in our minds. And what kind of car would Green Arrow or The Punisher tool around in? We’ve got that covered plus news on more 52 stuff from DC and the story of a woman whose music career was jump-started by a DJ.

Not bad for a Thursday, huh? So go on… Press The Button!

 

 

MIKE GOLD: Who’s taking the bullet?

MIKE GOLD: Who’s taking the bullet?

Funny thing about Fred Wertham.

Dr. Fred, in case you don’t know, was the guy who, back in the late 40s and early 50s, was concerned about all the sexual imagery and violence he saw in comics and its harmful impact on our nation’s youth.  He, and those many folks of similar mind, waxed poetic about this crawling evil in the pages of such then-popular general interest magazines as The Saturday Evening Post and Reader’s Digest. He later wrote it all up in a best-seller called Seduction of the Innocent, which helped lead to the establishment of the Comics Code censorship board.

It also lead to the establishment of a noisy all-star rock’n’roll band that starred Bill Mumy, Miguel Ferrer, Steve Leialoha, and Max Allan Collins. They released an album called, appropriately, The Golden Age. It was loud, and it featured Weird Al Yankovic on one track. But this has absolutely nothing to do with my point.

My point is, if sexual imagery and violence in comics were to be considered bad, then Dr. Fred wasn’t incorrect in his analysis of the medium. He was merely premature.

What he thought he found in the children’s comics (a redundancy) of the 50s can be easily discovered on the walls of any comic book shop today. Now, the industry’s defense might very well be “but these books are not for children,” and they’d be right. At today’s cover prices, with all the intertwined continuity and story arcs that command a commitment to multiple purchased, children can’t afford them. Heck, damn few adults can afford them, but adults should have the option of buying any sort of reading material they want.

But you would think that in these times of rising religious fundamentalism and “family values,” at least somebody would be bitching about all the blood and guts and astonishingly huge-breasted crime fighters, both female and male. I know my friends at the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund might disagree, but they fight for the comics retailers and creators who get nailed. I’m glad to see they don’t have to extend their meager resources any further than they have to.

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Spidey fame for your favorite kid

Spidey fame for your favorite kid

Looking for a gift to get the child in your life who’s just wild about Spider-Man?  Why not look into getting a personalized photo CD of a Spider-Man cartoon with said child’s photo digitally mapped onto the space where Spidey’s face goes, for a full-length cartoon?

Sayeth Kideo, "This 26 minute action packed animated adventure DVD includes bonus features such as a photo personalized music video featuring the1960’s theme song, as well as an educational tutorial on spiders in a segment titled ‘Learning with J. Jonah Jameson’." 

Because really, who’s more obsessed with spiders?

Berke Breathed helps police in murder investigation

Berke Breathed helps police in murder investigation

The Associated Press reports that cartoonist Berkely Breathed is helping police in an unsolved 1979 murder of a young musician.  Authorities believe the killer may have burglarized Breathed’s home when Breathed was a student at the University of Texas in Austin.

The cartoonist’s drawing of the burglary scene will be aired Saturday night on Fox’s America’s Most Wanted. "I had forgotten about it for many years," Breathed said Thursday in a telephone interview. "Once ‘America’s Most Wanted‘ called, I got angry about it all over again."

Cahill, 28, was shot to death April 13, 1979, when he confronted a burglar leaving his apartment with his guitar. The University of Texas dropout worked as a cook, but his main pursuit was a music career.

Driving up to his home with friends, he saw a man walking away with his guitar in its case. He jumped from the car, chased the man and was shot to death in his driveway. The killer escaped and was never identified.

Investigators believe the same person who shot Cahill had just broken into the apartment of a photographer in the same building.

Breathed, who now lives in Southern California, believes he surprised the intruder during the break-in at his Austin home about a week after the shooting. He said the burglar had stacked albums by his door, including Dark Side of the Moon by Pink Floyd.

"The house was turned upside down, and it took a few minutes to understand what happened," he said.

Like similar break-ins at the time, the perpetrator seemed to be focused on a few selected items.

"He ended up killing a musician, and he was stealing music as well as photographs and photographic equipment," Breathed said. "There was this odd connection between the music and photographic community."

MATT RAUB reveals: Bob Dylan is a Cylon!

MATT RAUB reveals: Bob Dylan is a Cylon!

So it’s been about two weeks since the season 3 finale of Battlestar Galactica. “Crossroads Part 2” has aired, and I’m tired of sitting on what I have to say about it. If you’re one of the unfortunate one’s who have still yet to see the show, here’s the spoilers: Basically we learned: who the final four Cylons turn out to be, how everyone copes with the recently deceased Starbuck, the outcome of the Gaius Baltar trial, that President Rosaline’s cancer has returned and she’s back on the wacky drug that made her see snakes, and finally, that Bob Dylan is a Cylon!

Don’t worry; I know there is a lot here, so I’m going to break it down for those playing along at home.

Those of you who remember the set-up in “Crossroads Part 1” know that throughout the episode, Colonel Tigh, Sam, Chief Tyrol, and Press Secretary Tory Foster (played by Michael Hogan, Aaron Douglas, Michael Trucco, and Rheka Sharma, respectively) hear strange sitar music that draws them toward the center of the ship. We don’t know where it comes from, only that these four are the only ones that can hear this music. We find out in the finale that mysterious music is a cover of the Bob Dylan song “All Along the Watchtower” – and not Jimi Hendrix’s, either! Now, those of you who read my review for the film 300 know my feelings about switching from orchestral beats to heavy modern guitar, but that goes full force when it’s a sci-fi show that uses an actual song when the show takes place millions of years ago and/or galaxies away!

Either way, we discover that these people hearing the music are drawn together and discover that they are all Cylon sleeper agents. This is probably one of the biggest moments in the season, and I feel likeit  didn’t get the respect it deserved by clumping all of the Cylon-outings in one scene.

Moving on, we also get the verdict of the excruciatingly long trial of Giaus Baltar. The arc basically consisted of a whole lot of father/son Adama melodrama, cranky Rosaline explains how her cancer has returned (which should be a non-issue because we know that the bastard Cylon-baby is the cure) and some more mystifying lines from Batlar’s lawyer, Matt Murdock-lite Romo Lampkin (played by 24’s Mark Sheppard). After some deep prodding from the prosecution, a recently de-commissioned Apollo takes the stand and gives this entire speech on what he’s been feeling from day one. This was a great little monologue, because he talks about how the fleet has forgiven all of its past “crimes against humanity,” referencing a lot of the back story along the way. Essentially this is what persuades the tribunal of judges to give Baltar a verdict of not guilty.

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