Barefoot In The Dark, by Dennis O’Neil

Dennis O'Neil

Dennis O'Neil

Dennis O'Neil was born in 1939, the same year that Batman first appeared in Detective Comics. It was thus perhaps fated that he would be so closely associated with the character, writing and editing the Dark Knight for more than 30 years. He's been an editor at Marvel and DC Comics. In addition to Batman, he's worked on Spider-Man, Daredevil, Iron Man, Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern/Green Arrow, the Question, The Shadow and more. O'Neil has won every major award in the industry. His prose novels have been New York Times bestsellers. Denny lives in Rockland County with his wife, Marifran.

You may also like...

6 Responses

  1. Russ Rogers says:

    Last year, my nephew entered a "National History Day" competition. He did a project on the Atomic Bomb and the bombing of Japan. I suggested that he use "Barefoot Gen" as source material. He ended up making the book part of his display. Some of the judges of the competition were confused by having a comic book in a history display. Other judges were very impressed that he was hip enough to know about "Barefoot Gen" and use it as primary source material. He ended up doing very well and was recognized at the state level. I had read a short volume of this more than 25 years ago. Amazon.com said that Barefoot Gen is being presented in an all new translation of a TEN part series. I hadn't realized the work was that large. Amazon.com only seems to carry four volumes. Volumes 5 and 6 just came out in April, 2008. Volumes seven to ten haven't been translated yet. Last Gasp (the USA publisher) has all six.http://www.lastgasp.com/1/9/0/0/barefoot/gen/Shūkan Shōnen Jampu is Weekly Shonen Jump, an anthology series that sells THREE MILLION copies a week in Japan. A WEEK! It has sold as many as SIX million a week. It started in 1968 and is still running strong. It's about the size of a phone book. Shonen Jump is responsible for many of the manga and anime series that pervade our culture, including Yu-Gi-Oh, Bleach, Naruto, Dragonball Z, the list goes on and on. "Shonen" means "young boy" in Japanese. So I guess a rough translation is "Weekly Young Boys Magazine."http://www.japan-zone.com/modern/manga.shtml

  2. Leonard Rifas says:

    Thank you for your column recommending Nakazawa's _Barefoot Gen_. As for your claim that "there was nothing remotely funny about Barefoot Gen," I have flipped through my copy of the first volume and you are more right than I had remembered. I frequently show the first of the two animated feature films that Nakazawa made about Gen to students, and in that film, lighter scenes appear between the heavier ones to give viewers a chance to catch our breath, laugh and identify more strongly with the characters. As part of the preparation for that powerful film, I have my students read Nakazawa's comic book _I SAW IT_ (_Ore wa Mita_), in which he tells his life story in comic book format without the fictionalization of Gen. Although I published it in 1982, I have boxes of them left and would be glad to send a free copy of that comic book to your readers for a self-addressed stamped envelope sent to EduComics, box 45831, Seattle, WA 98145-0831, USA.

    • Mike Gold says:

      Thank you, Leonard. That's a fantastic gesture — I read I SAW IT, and I recommend it most highly to one and all.How much postage should folks stick on the envelope?

  3. Leonard Rifas says:

    Mike, I notice that "promotional comments may be removed." If the moderators permit me to add this one thing, I will be glad to work out the details with anyone who writes to me at rifas@earthlink,net. I included your endorsement of _I SAW IT_ in the article I wrote about republishing NAkazawa's work, "Globalizing Comic Books from Below: how manga came to America," which was published by the International Journal of Comic Art. I remain grateful for your support.

  4. BobH says:

    Thanks for the review, and to Russ for noticing that volumes five and six were out. I've ordered them, should have them in a few days. I also didn't know there were more than the four books, much less ten books total, until the new editions came out, and with the long gap was afraid sales didn't warrant continuing. And I strongly recommend taking Leonard up on his offer for I SAW IT. Beautiful book, Leonard, thanks for publishing it.Regarding the new editions of the first four books, I reviewed them a while back. I looked at the differences in how they flipped the artwork in this post and outlined the three major extended scenes (really whole storylines, about 150 pages) over here.

  5. BobH says:

    Thanks for the review, and to Russ for noticing that volumes five and six were out. I've ordered them, should have them in a few days. I also didn't know there were more than the four books, much less ten books total, until the new editions came out, and with the long gap was afraid sales didn't warrant continuing. And I strongly recommend taking Leonard up on his offer for I SAW IT. Beautiful book, Leonard, thanks for publishing it.Regarding the new editions of the first four books, I reviewed them a while back. I looked at the differences in how they flipped the artwork in this post and outlined the three major extended scenes (really whole storylines, about 150 pages) over here.