Tagged: Strange Horizons

ANDREW’S LINKS: Defending Freedom

ANDREW’S LINKS: Defending Freedom

Comics Links

The ACLU has a new online comic to explain its mission: Defenders of Freedom. (I would have used a panel from one of their stories to illustrate this post but – irony of ironies – it’s left-click disabled, locked down tight by proprietary software. So, instead, you get the very first Google image for the search “defender of freedom,” because Andrew Wheeler is all about the random fun. It’s from this page, by the way.)

Mike Carey talks to Comic Book Resources.

CBR also interviews Action Philosophers! creator Fred Van Lente.

Wizard chats with Jim Shooter, once and future writer of the Legion of Super-Heroes.

Occasional Superheroine, at the Baltimore Comic-Con, found the crowd incredibly conservative and unwilling to look at any materials outside the usual Punchy McSuper-Dude “mainstream.”

Kevin Jones of Culture Magazine has an essay on Craig Thompson’s graphic novel Blankets.

Comix Talk interviews Krishna Sadasivam, creator of the webcomic PC Weenies.

Bookslut interviews Journalista!’s Dirk Deppey.

Comic World News interviews Jason Thompson, author of Manga: The Complete Guide.

Comics Reviews

Augie De Blieck, Jr. (of Comic Book Resources) reviews Asterix in Spain.

Comic Book Bin reviews Jaime Hernandez’s Maggie the Mechanic.

Comics and More reviews two manga collections: MPD Psycho, Vol. 1 and To Terra, Vol. 2.

Newsarama lists its picks for the week.

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COMICS LINKS: Times Gets It Late

COMICS LINKS: Times Gets It Late

Comics Links

The New York Times declares that Britain is finally embracing the graphic novel. Well, good for them!

Inside Pulse apparently has a story about comics, but some kind of SQL error is preventing me from actually reading it. Perhaps simply knowing it exists will give some readers a tiny bit of pleasure.

Publishers Weekly Comics Week interviews Gravitation creator Maki Murakami.

PWCW also talked to Ioannis Mentzas about the upcoming English-language publication of Osamu Tezuka’s massive MW.

Comic Book Resources interviews Y: The Last Man editor Will Dennis about the upcoming end of that series.

The Beat tries to figure out what graphic novels have been selling the best this year.

Comics Should Be Good has a long, impressively detailed (even, one might say, nitpicky) list of character names used, in one form or another, by both Marvel and DC. Study it and win bar bets next year at San Diego!

Comics Reviews

Jeff VanderMeer’s new ComicBookSlut column at Bookslut looks at Gipi’s Notes for a War Story, Postcards: True Stories That Never Happened, and more.

The New York Sun reviews a new biography of Ronald Reagan in comics form.

Comics Reporter reviews the new issue of Gabrielle Bell’s Lucky.

Another Comics Reporter review (by another hand): Greffier by Joann Sfar.

At The Savage Critics, Graeme McMillan reviews Amazons Attack #6 and other things.

Newsarama picks their favorite books of the week.

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COMICS LINKS: Back To The Rack

COMICS LINKS: Back To The Rack

Labor Day’s over and it’s back to work or school. Here’s some cheap thrills to get you through the day. (Our illustration is a recent Clay Bennett editorial cartoon.)

Comics Links

The Daily Cross Hatch interviews Evan Dorkin (in the first of what may be many parts).

Eddie Campbell remembers zipatone.

Comic Book Resources talks to Paul Jenkins.

Just in case you missed it: Monday was, in the Comic Curmudgeon’s words, Fööberdämmerung.

Comic Addiction talks to Ben Templesmith.

Newsarama slashes summer. No, really. That’s what it says.

The Montreal Gazette reports that a Dragon Ball Z live-action movie will be filmed there over the next year. OK, is there any chance that this won’t suck? [via Newsarama]

Comics Reviews

Brian Cronin of Comics Should Be Good reviews the first issue of the new magazine about comics, Comics Foundry.

From The Savage Critics:

SF/Fantasy Links

SF Scope reports that the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) have just suspended their ePiracy committee in the wake of SFWA Vice President Andrew Burt’s recent badly-handled complaints against the Internet text-sharing site Scridb. (The full SFWA motion is also available on their LJ community.)

Robert J. Sawyer thinks the process for the Canadian SF award the Prix Aurora is horribly messed up this year — but he has a suggestion to help fix it.

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Today’s Hot Comics Links

Today’s Hot Comics Links

Comics Links

Suspension of Disbelief (which I haven’t seen updated much lately, so I hope it’s back) looks at Spirit #5, and that old bad-plotting standby, beating a guy until he signs a contract/confession/whatever.

Think the San Diego Comic-Con is big? It’s only the third largest comics gathering in the world – and number one is Japan’s Comiket, held twice a year in Tokyo. This past weekend, about 550,000 people were there.

Forbidden Planet International reports on graphic novels at the recent Edinburgh International Book Festival.

Publishers Weekly reports on the recent land-rush business in movie rights for graphic novels.

Newsarama rounds up and comments on a bunch of stories about DC comics’s Zuda project.

Canada’s National Post reports on the Toronto Comic Arts Festival.

The Chicago Tribune talks to Douglas Wolk about whether comics are getting any respect.

The LA Times has noticed that some comics have been “slabbed” by CGC. Once again, the mainstream press runs about a decade behind events in the comics world…

Comics Reviews

Graeme McMillan of The Savage Critics admits that he’s a latecomer to Ultimate Spider-Man, but he likes #112.

Comics Reporter reviews an anthology comic from a few years back, Reactor Girl #6.

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Link-o-Rama

Link-o-Rama

Times Online looks back at the British ‘80s craze for Fighting Fantasy.

The Millions has a looooong post (no, really, it’s long) about Harry Potter from a children’s librarian’s perspective.

Queen guitarist Brian May has gone back to school — to finish his doctorate in astrophysics. That’s a smart move – you always want to have a day-job to fall back on, if the music thing doesn’t work out.

John Scalzi has discovered a typewriter that sends e-mail.

Lou Anders explains patiently that SF is not dead. (Me, I’d have just pointed out that anyone who goes to a Nebula Awards Weekend in New York City – horribly expensive New York City, not to mention nightlife-dead Way the Hell Downtown NYC – and expects the demographic not to be “middle-aged to old” is deluding himself about the interests and finances of young SF-reading people.)

And you’ve heard about NASA’s drunk astronauts by now, yes?

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F&SF Book Reviews

F&SF Book Reviews

The Agony Column reviews Ibrahim S. Amin’s The Monster Hunter’s Handbook.

Fantasybookspot reviews David Bilsborough’s first novel, the epic fantasy The Wanderer’s Tale.

Fantasybookspot also reviews Julie E. Czerneda’s Survival.

SFF World reviews The Dark River by John Twelve Hawks.

SciFi UK Review also covers the June issue of Hub magazine.

Strange Horizons reviews Scarlet Thomas’s The End of Mr. Y.

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SF&SF Book Reviews

SF&SF Book Reviews

Neth Space reviews Tobias S. Buckell’s first novel, the alien-planet adventure novel Crystal Rain.

The Agony Column reviews Paul McAuley’s Cowboy Angels.

Monsters & Critics reviews an anthology called Many Bloody Returns, though I can’t quite read who the editors are.

SciFi Weekly reviews Emma Bull’s new Wild West fantasy novel, Territory.

SFF World reviews Dave Duncan’s Mother of Lies, the second of two books in his current fantasy series.

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Science Fiction/Fantasy Book Reviews

Science Fiction/Fantasy Book Reviews

SF Signal reviews the novelization of the Transfomers movie by Alan Dean Foster.

Fantasy Book Critic reviews The Dark River by John Twelve Hawks.

Pat’s Fantasy Hotlist shamelessly plugs Tad Williams’s Otherland series.

Strange Horizons continues reviewing John Crowley’s AEgypt novels this week with a look at the second book, Love & Sleep.

Book Fetish covers Marjorie M. Liu’s paranormal romance Soul Song.

Clare Light does quick reviews of Laurie J. Marks’s Water Logic and Walter Mosley’s 47.

Interzone reviews Marianne de Pierres’s new space opera Dark Light.

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Science Fiction/Fantasy Magazine News

Science Fiction/Fantasy Magazine News

The fifth issue of Helix, a free on-line magazine dedicated to publishing stories too extreme for regular print SF/F magazines, has just been published, with new stories by Esther Friesner, Brenda Clough, and others.

Locus, the newsmagazine of the SF/Fantasy field, has mailed their July issue, and posted a profile page about it on their website. The July issue includes interviews with Peter S. Beagle and Paolo Bacigalupi, results from this year’s Locus Poll, and lots of news and reviews.

There’s a new issue of SF Site for July, with lots of reviews, a listing of new books received, and whatnot.

Strange Horizons has an update every Monday, and this week is no exception; new this time is a story by Jerome Steuart and a poem by David Lunde.

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Science Fiction/Fantasy Book Reviews, June 28th

Science Fiction/Fantasy Book Reviews, June 28th

The Agony Column loves Matthew Hughes’s new far-future philosophical detective comedy The Spiral Labyrinth, and doesn’t care who knows it.

OF Blog of the Fallen reviews Tobias S. Buckell’s second novel, the space opera Ragamuffin.

Strange Horizons reviews the new Mike Resnick-edited anthology of future police stories, Alien Crimes.

Blogcritics reviews Interworld, by Neil Gaiman and Michael Reaves. (An amusing sidenote: Gaiman recently explained how he and Reaves originally pitched the idea as a movie, couldn’t get any interest from Hollywood, and wrote it up as a novel instead…only to have Hollywood come begging.)

The St. Marys-Mt. Druitt Star (one of my favorite newspaper names, by the way) has a very short, and not terribly useful, review of Cornelia Funke’s acclaimed Young Adult novel The Thief Lord.

David Louis Edelman (author of Infoquake and all-around smart guy) has been re-reading all of J.R.R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth stories and blogging about them; he’s just now gotten to that interesting item, Unfinished Tales.

Kate Nepveu reviews Charles Stross’s Hugo-nominated novel Glasshouse.

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