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Michael Davis: I Want My Props!

Michael Davis: I Want My Props!

Dear whoever decides who should be recognized with awards and whatnot;

My name is Michael Davis. You’re no doubt heard of me. Depending on who you ask

, you will get many different stories.

I’m sure they are all entertaining, like the one where  I killed a cat for looking at me or was caught in bed with an underage nanny goat while high on Elmer’s Glue. Stories vary but are pretty much all bullshit. I’ve said for decades that…shit, never mind. What’s the point of me saying anything that proves it’s all bullshit? People like to believe rumors, and I’m a bit too old to give a fish anymore.

Since no one is talking about my contributions to the industry (except when I was thought to be dead), I’ve decided that I would.

I am the only comic book creator with a comic book series in the American school system taught as a curriculum.

So incredible was that feat, The Gordon Parks Academy named their auditorium after me. I’m pretty sure no comic book creator has gotten that honor either.

It’s called The Action Files, and it was so successful the original hardcover series now goes for over $700 bucks on Amazon, if you can find someone willing to sell their copies.

Oh, and it’s been selling for over 25 years. So this ‘recent trend’ of comics in the schools an educational comics blah blah blah can thank me.

I started it.

I was not only there first; I’m still the only comic book creator with a comic book series in the American school system taught as a curriculum.

So, it’s only fair that an achievement like that is given some props, right?

OR…answer the question of why is an achievement of such magnitude acknowledged by academia but not my peers?

Is it the underage nanny goat while high on Elmer’s Glue rumor?

The truth is that goat was over 18.

Please feel free to start with my Pulitzer throw in my Nobel Peace Prize. Wait, those are not industry awards or honors. But I bet if I won those

, it would look silly if my industry ignored my accomplishments, would it not?

Did I mention I’m the only comic book creator with a comic book series taught as a curriculum in the American school system or the auditorium with my name on it in the school named after one of the greatest thinkers of the 20th Century?

Most likely, you’re unaware of the Action Files

, which is the reason I’ve been left out of all those reindeer games.

Well, the more you know…

Win a Digital HD Code for Edgar Wright’s Last Night in Soho

Win a Digital HD Code for Edgar Wright’s Last Night in Soho

Edgar Wright’s acclaimed fall film, Last Night in Soho, arrives on streaming services today and will hit 4K UHD, Blu-ray, and DVD on January 18.

Our friends at Universal Home Entertainment have provided us with two digital codes to share with readers. Ellie Turner (Thomasin McKenzie) loves the music and fashion of the Swinging Sixties. In order to win one

, please tell us which era provides you with the same affection for its own music and fashion.

Submit your responses by 11:59 p.m., Monday, January 10. The decision of ComicMix’s judges will be final.

From the acclaimed director of fan-favorites such as Baby Driver, Shaun of the Dead and The World’s End comes the “mesmerizing and ultra-stylish” (US Weekly) tribute to 1960s London, LAST NIGHT IN SOHO, available to own for the first time on Digital January 4

, 2022 and 4K Ultra HD, Blu-rayTM and DVD January 18, 2022 from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment. “A stunning achievement of filmmaking” (LA Times), LAST NIGHT IN SOHO is filled to the brim with thrills, suspense and a love of classic film and music in every frame. Own the cinematic masterpiece for the first time, alongside exclusive bonus content, including never-before-seen deleted scenes, behind-the-scenes content and feature commentaries exploring the intoxicating nostalgia, flair and suspense.

In Edgar Wright’s psychological thriller, Eloise (Thomasin McKenzie, Jojo Rabbit, Old), an aspiring fashion designer, is mysteriously able to enter the 1960s, where she encounters a dazzling wannabe singer, Sandie (Anya Taylor-Joy, Emma, “The Queen’s Gambit”). But the glamour is not all it appears to be, and the dreams of the past start to crack and splinter into something far darker.

The “seductive and sophisticated” (NY Times) masterpiece is directed by Edgar Wright, and stars Thomasin McKenzie, Anya Taylor-Joy, Matt Smith (The Crown, Doctor Who) and Michael Ajao (Attack the Block, Silent Witness). The film is co-written by Edgar Wright and Krysty Wilson-Cairns (1917).

BONUS FEATURES on 4K UHD, BLU-RAYTM, DVD AND DIGITAL:

  • MAKING OF FEATURETTES
    • MEET ELOISE – An in-depth look at the character of Eloise and the challenges that star Thomasin McKenzie faced while bringing her to life.
    • DREAMING OF SANDIE – A closer look at the characters of Sandie and Jack and why Anya Taylor-Joy and Matt Smith were the perfect actors to embody the essence of the time period.
    • SMOKE AND MIRRORS – The cast and crew break down how lighting, makeup, special effects, and creative camerawork came together to create a collision between the present day and 1960’s time periods.
    • ON THE STREETS OF SOHO – The cast and crew discuss the importance of shooting on location in Soho and the complexity of transforming the city streets back in time.
    • TIME TRAVELLING – A look into how the music, costume design, and production design of the film work together to immerse the audience into the world of 1960’s Soho.
  • DELETED SCENES
  • ANIMATICS
    • FIRST DREAM
    • SHADOW MEN
    • MURDER
    • FINAL CONFRONTATION
  • EXTRAS
    • HAIR & MAKEUP TESTS**
    • LIGHTING & VFX TESTS**
    • WIDE ANGLE WITNESS CAM
    • ACTON TOWN HALL STEADICAM REHEARSAL**
  • “DOWNTOWN” MUSIC VIDEO**
  • TRAILERS**
  • FEATURE COMMENTARY WITH DIRECTOR/CO-WRITER EDGAR WRIGHT, EDITOR PAUL MACHLISS AND COMPOSER STEVE PRICE
  • FEATURE COMMENTARY WITH DIRECTOR/CO-WRITER EDGAR WRIGHT AND CO-WRITER KRISTY WILSON-CAIRNS

**available on 4K, BD and Digital only

REVIEW: The Mitchells vs. the Machines.

REVIEW: The Mitchells vs. the Machines.

Many worthy films for all audiences flew under the pop culture radar in 2021, released with some fanfare but overshadowed by current events. Take the animated Connected, for example. Announced by Sony for 2020, it briefly arrived in theaters in April before hitting Netflix under the name The Mitchells vs. the Machines.

Now available in a Blu-ray/DVD/Digital HD combo pack, the film is well worth your time and attention. First of all, it’s funny and good for the entire family to enjoy together. Second, it has some fine messages underneath the frenetic pace and stuffed visuals.

Rick (Danny McBride) loves nature and is a bit of a technophobe, setting up a conflict with his daughter Katie (Abbi Jacobson), who is about to attend film school. When their visions clash one more time, he cancels her flight and decides to pack the family into their old station wagon and drive across the country. His wife Linda (Maya Rudolph) and young son Aaron (Mike Rianda) don’t necessarily want to interrupt their lives but off they go.

As they ride the highway, the evil tech genius Mark Bowman (Eric André), having had his PAL (cute) AI declared obsolete, enacts his revenge by having the next generation of PAL programmed to capture all of mankind and launch them into space. Our heroic family narrowly avoids this and it’s up to them to save the world from technology gone wild.

On the macro level, we have the obvious save the world plot, but underneath it, Rick is trying to save not only his family but his relationship with his eldest. The film is stuffed with other characters with an impressive vocal cast with John Legend and Chrissy Teigen playing married neighbors, whose daughter Abbey (Charlyne Yi) is the object of Aaron’s adolescent desire; and a series of PALs, led by Olivia Colman, clearly having fun.

The animation is impressive as it blends the hand-drawn with CGI overlays, letting director/co-writer Mike Rianda pack plenty of action, comedy, and commentary.

The 1080p high-definition transfer is excellent

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, capturing all the colorful nonsense and keeping things crisp. The DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 lossless soundtrack is fine but struggles to keep up in places.

The combo pack has delightfully creative liner notes worth a read. The disc contains not only the theatrical release but Katie’s Extended Cinematic Bonanza Cut! (1:52:48) adding about two minutes of extended/alternate scenes without the CGI enhancements. It also comes with an intro from Rianda.

Special Features include Dog Cop 7: The Final Chapter (8:24), Katie’s student film; Bonus Scenes! (25:18), a collection of deleted and extended scenes; Katie’s Cabinet of Forgotten Wonders (11:24): Katie-Vision!; Dumb Robots Trailer; The Original Mitchells Story Pitch; The Furby Scene – How? Why?; and Pal’s World; The Mitchells vs. The Machines: Or How a Group of Passionate Weirdos Made a Big Animated Movie (12:49); How To… : Audiences learn how to Make Sock Puppets (1:48) and Make Katie Face Cupcakes (1:56); and Audio Commentary: Director Mike Rianda, Visual Effects Supervisor Miks Lasker, Production Designer Lindsey Olivares

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, Co-Writer/Co-Director Jeff Rowe, Producer Kurt Albrecht, Head of Animation Alan Hawkins, and Head of Story Guillermo Martinez —with so many creators chatting, it’s a fun review of their ambitions and reflections.

Ghostbusters: Afterlife Available on Digital Tuesday, 4K UHD, Blu-ray & DVD 2/1

Ghostbusters: Afterlife Available on Digital Tuesday, 4K UHD, Blu-ray & DVD 2/1

SYNOPSIS

GHOSTBUSTERS: AFTERLIFE
From director Jason Reitman and producer Ivan Reitman comes the next chapter in the original Ghostbusters universe. In Ghostbusters: Afterlife

, when a single mom and her two kids arrive in a small town, they begin to discover their connection to the original Ghostbusters and the secret legacy their grandfather, an original Ghostbuster, left behind. The film is written by Gil Kenan & Jason Reitman.

GHOSTBUSTERS ULTIMATE COLLECTION 4K ULTRA HD SET
Featuring GHOSTBUSTERS, GHOSTBUSTERS II and GHOSTBUSTERS: AFTERLIFE on 4K Ultra HD & Blu-ray, plus two discs full of special features! Includes over 20 hours of rare behind-the-scenes and must-see archival gems, including the full Preview Cut of the original movie and much, much more! Presented in collectible “ghost trap” packaging with lights, and includes a full 220-page reprint of the rare 1985 “Making GHOSTBUSTERS” book! Also includes digital versions of GHOSTBUSTERS, GHOSTBUSTERS II, GHOSTBUSTERS: ANSWER THE CALL and GHOSTBUSTERS: AFTERLIFE.  

BONUS MATERIALS 

 
GHOSTBUSTERS: AFTERLIFE

BLU-RAY™, 4K Ultra HD™ and Digital

  • We Got One! Easter Eggs Revealed
  • Ghostbusters: A Look Back
  • A Look Ahead
  • Bringing Ecto-1 Back to Life
  • The Gearhead’s Guide to Ghostbusters Gadgets
  • Special Effects: The Ghosts of Afterlife
  • Deleted Scene: Is It Ever Too Late?
  • Summoning the Spirit: Making Ghostbusters: Afterlife

DVD

  • Summoning the Spirit: Making Ghostbusters: Afterlife
     

THE GHOSTBUSTERS ULTIMATE COLLECTION

Theatrical Trailers

CAST AND CREW

GHOSTBUSTERS: AFTERLIFE
Directed By: Jason Reitman
Written By: Gil Kenan & Jason Reitman
Produced by: Ivan Reitman
Executive Producers: Dan Aykroyd, Gil Kenan, Jason Blumenfeld, Michael Beugg, Aaron L. Gilbert and Jason Cloth
Cast: Carrie Coon, Finn Wolfhard, Mckenna Grace, Annie Potts, Ernie Hudson and Paul Rudd.

GHOSTBUSTERS
Produced and Directed By: Ivan Reitman
Written By: Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis
Executive Producer: Bernie Brillstein
Cast: Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Sigourney Weaver, Harold Ramis, Ernie Hudson, Rick Moranis

GHOSTBUSTERS II
Produced and Directed By: Ivan Reitman
Written By: Harold Ramis and Dan Aykroyd
Executive Producers: Bernie Brillstein, Joe Medjuck, Michael C. Gross
Cast: Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Sigourney Weaver, Harold Ramis, Rick Moranis, Ernie Hudson, Annie Potts
 
GHOSTBUSTERS: ANSWER THE CALL
Directed By: Paul Feig
Produced By: Ivan Reitman, Amy Pascal
Written By: Katie Dippold & Paul Feig
Executive Producers: Paul Feig, Jessie Henderson, Dan Aykroyd, Tom Pollock, Joe Medjuck, Ali Bell, Michele Imperato Stabile
Cast: Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Kate McKinnon, Leslie Jones, Charles Dance, Michael Kenneth Williams and Chris Hemsworth
 

SPECS
GHOSTBUSTERS: AFTERLIFE (4K Ultra HD™, BLU-RAY™, DVD)
Run Time: 124 minutes
Rating: PG-13
4K Ultra HD: Feature: 2160p Ultra High Definition 2.40:1 | Audio: 5.1 Dolby Atmos (Dolby True HD 7.1 compatible)
Blu-ray™: Feature: 1080p High Definition 2.40:1 | Audio: 5.1 Dolby Digital
DVD: Feature: 2.40:1 Anamorphic Widescreen | Audio: 5.1 Dolby Digital

Sex Criminals, Vol. 6: Six Criminals by Matt Fraction and Chip Zdarsky

So I’m a year late here: I was going to point out that this series took longer to complete than I expected, and so I was not as invested in this book as I could have been. But one whole year of the delay is on me, so mentioning that a comic that started in September 2013 and only ran thirty-one issues probably shouldn’t have taken seven years might not come across well.

Or maybe I’ll passive-aggressively say I’m not going to do that. Pointless passive-aggression is pretty on-brand for a discussion of Sex Criminals, right?

Anyway, Six Criminals  is the sixth and last collection of the comic: it includes the final story arc (well

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, the five issues in which the story ends; it was all one “arc,” basically) and the fantabulous extra issue #69, in which two minor characters have a destination wedding a few years later and all of the surviving characters show up to celebrate and bounce off each other one last time in a vastly lower-stakes way. Like the rest of the series, it was written by Matt Fraction and drawn by Chip Zdarsky. (See my post for volume five

, or drop back to the first one if you have no idea about the series.)

(Consumer Note: references to this book say it contains issues #26-69, which is technically true but deeply misleading. They mean issues #26-30 and #69. There is nothing in between.)

My reaction to it was pretty muted, and I’m trying to figure out why. Maybe I waited too long, and the previous volumes had gotten fuzzy in memory. Maybe I was secretly hoping for the Big Ending to go a different way – though I think it works just fine, is constructed well, entirely fits the characters as we know them, and is satisfying. Maybe it’s just me.

This book does fulfill the promises of the previous collection, where all of the sex-powered people we’d met join forces and start talking about taking down the big bad, a probably borderline-sociopathic business magnate who, we learn in this book, has been stealing all of Our Heroes’ precious bodily fluids (well

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, energy) in order to power what he hopes is a time machine. Yes, that’s very weird: Sex Criminals has kept digging new levels of weird from the initial some-people-freeze-time-when-they-come premise, as it finds new possibilities for sex-based superpowers.

(Sidebar: Say, do you think Sex Criminals was originally pitched as “Chew , but about fucking”? If not, why not?)

There is a reasonably happy ending for the world in general, if not for Suze and Jon’s relationship, which has looked intermittently doomed the entire length of the series. (Jon in particular has never been the most stable of people.) In the end, it’s still basically Suze’s story, as it started out, though focus wanders around among the rest of the cast, as it must when you have that many people. That part is very realistic, and I appreciated it: so many stories, in comics and out of it, slam the two main characters together at the end even if that’s an inherently bad idea.

I bet this all reads better if you run through it all relatively quickly; I read the first volume back in 2014 and have never re-read older issues before hitting new ones. It’s all good stuff, and adult in both the under-the-counter (it’s about sex! you see nudity and sexual stuff on the page!) and the grown-up (people have relationships that grow and change! those relationships are often weird or nonstandard!) ways. It’s definitely worth reading, if you are old enough to do so legally in your jurisdiction.

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Reposted from The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent.

A Shining Beacon by James Albon

In some world that is not precisely our own – maybe the near future, maybe an alternate present – an island nation has an autocratic, near-fascist government. There is, of course, a revolutionary group aiming to overthrow that regime, which includes violent activities.

It is not the UK, exactly. But it is very much like the UK, more than it’s like any other nation on earth.

The regime is building a major public-works project in the capital: a large sports facility with a huge swimming pool at its center. And the Department of Culture needs to find an artist to paint a giant mural over that pool. The mural must be uplifting but not political, lovely but not challenging, colorful but not incorporating any imagery or ideas from the rebels or anyone else hostile to the regime, artistically powerful but without any deep or hidden messages, and entirely approved by various top ministers.

This is of course impossible. It’s also demanded, and must happen.

Functionaries at the Department of Culture, after several metropolitan candidates are rejected, settle on Francesca Saxon, a youngish woman from the North of the country, an artist with a relatively provincial career so far and no hint of the wrong politics. She is summoned to the capital and set up in a luxury hotel to create that mural. She never applied for the job, or really had a moment to decline it.

She might perhaps have preferred to return home and work in her own studio, but those are not the regime’s plans. And the whole point of autocracy is that it demands everything conforms to its plans, even if those plans change instantly.

Francesca’s mural, or perhaps the sports centre in general, is meant to be A Shining Beacon  for the entire nation; that phrase repeats throughout the graphic novel, and clearly was originated by some very high power in the autocracy.

We don’t know who that was; we don’t get names for most of the characters and we never see or understand the top level of this government. Instead, people are known by their function – minster of this, secretary of that – or seen doing what they do. If there is a dictator or politburo over it all, we know nothing of that.

The rebels place someone close to Francesca; she doesn’t realize this for a long time. The rebels perhaps have a strong case against the regime – it is brutal and repressive and murderous – but they are no better themselves

, and it’s not clear that this nation would be any better if they were to seize power.

Francesca struggles to make the mural the government demands, as their demands shift almost daily and every one of her sketches is found deficient in some new way. Rebel imagery crops up in some of those sketches as Francesca becomes more frustrated by her gilded cage, and she evades her armed government minder more and more often. She also comes to know that minder better on a personal level along the way; her frustration in being guarded by him is mirrored by his frustration in how she makes his work harder by sneaking away. And this regime is not kind to people who fail it

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, whether that failure is related to making art or guarding artists.

It all ends in violence and destruction, as always happens in a repressive regime: violence is the tool those regimes know best, and the best tool their enemies have against them.

James Albon tells this story calmly, straightforwardly, in watercolors highlighted by bright, almost day-glo colors on darker backgrounds – Francesca’s blonde hair in particular pops in every panel she appears. His lettering is organic, the slightest bit rough, an unexpected touch for a book so driven by dialogue. His camera flies in and out from panel to panel, to share focus between the architecture and the people: both are equally important here.

It comes across something like a historical document: A Shining Beacon reads a bit like the chronicles of something that happened, not that long ago, in a nation not far away from our own. There is an inevitability to all of its plot twists; this is how it all had to happen, and how it would always happen.

It is both not a political book and deeply a political book. It makes no specific points, and never names the ideology of the regime. But then, regimes like this have the same core ideology anyway, no matter what their public statements say. It’s all about holding onto power, nothing more. Albon, I think, would not characterize it as a warning about anything: that’s not what A Shining Beacon does. It is a story, about one person in an impossible situation, and how she tries to navigate it and eventually sees how impossible it always was.

It does that very well. It may have lessons for those who engage deeply with it. And it may have warnings to those of us who see aspects of Albon’s fictional regime in our own nations.

Reposted from The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent.

New Images from Catwoman: Hunted

New Images from Catwoman: Hunted

Only Catwoman would be so clever as to hide in plain sight – at a Leviathan costume party with a Super Hero/Villain theme – while crashing the event on the arm of Black Mask. Such are the hijinks of Catwoman: Hunted, the feature-length, anime-style film produced by Warner Bros. Animation, DC and Warner Bros. Home Entertainment. The film comes to 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Combo Pack, Blu-ray and Digital on February 8, 2022.

You can practically see the strategic cunning – not to mention a hint of mischief in the eyes of Catwoman in this close-up from the opening moments of Catwoman: Hunted. Elizabeth Gillies (Dynasty, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll, Vacation) leads the star-studded voice cast as Catwoman.

If you’re going to crash a party, you might as well go all the way – by sweet-talking obviously-interested Black Mask into bringing you along as his guest in the opening scene from Catwoman: Hunted. Elizabeth Gillies (Dynasty, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll, Vacation) and Jonathan Banks (Breaking Bad, Better Call Saul) provide the voices of Catwoman and Black Mask, respectively.

Catwoman strolls into a party – that is filled with members of the villainous coalition, Leviathan – surrounded by Black Mask and his henchman in the opening scene of Catwoman: Hunted. Elizabeth Gillies (Dynasty, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll, Vacation) and Jonathan Banks (Breaking Bad, Better Call Saul) give voice to Catwoman and Black Mask

, respectively.

And in related news, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment has shifted the release date of the Emmy Award-winning The Batman: The Complete Series to March 1, 2022 on Blu-ray+Digital ($69.99 SRP) in the United States, and a Blu-ray only package ($79.98 SRP) in Canada. 

This is the first time the fully-remastered, 65-episode series has been distributed on Blu-ray. Produced by Warner Bros. Animation and DC, the six-time Emmyâ Award-winning series follows 20-something-year-old Bruce Wayne’s early adventures as he balances his daytime persona as a bachelor billionaire with his nighttime guise as a caped crimefighter. Along the way

, Batman is joined by allies Robin and Batgirl as they combat Gotham City’s Rogues’ Gallery, including updated versions of his familiar foes as well as a bevy of rarely seen villains like Killer Moth and The Everywhere Man. Join one of the most complex and intriguing character in comic book history for action-packed super heroic adventures that test the limits of this legendary character’s extraordinary physical prowess and super-sleuthing skills.

The date change was made in order to enhance the visibility of the box set in retail outlets.

Black Dog: The Dreams of Paul Nash by Dave McKean

You know what’s weird? Reading a book about an artist with no examples of that artist’s work – but pages filled with art by somebody else. It might be inherent in the form – a graphic novel about an artist who’s been dead about seventy years – but it’s still weird.

It would be fine if the artist the book was about was someone world-famous – someone’s whose style was instant recognizable, and could be called to mind by any of us. Oh, it would still be at least a little weird to have a book all about an artist with art by someone else, but it would be the kind of weird that happens every day.

Paul Nash, though, is not world-famous. He was a British gallery painter in the first half of the 20th century, formed strongly by his fighting in the Great War, and noted as a surrealist for the rest of his life. Art historians know him, devotees know him, probably a lot of museum-goers do – but he’s no Picasso or Monet or even Turner, to live in the minds of millions every day.

All that hit me, as I got to the end of Black Dog: The Dreams of Paul Nash , a 2016 graphic novel by Dave McKean. I realized I really didn’t know what Paul Nash’s art looked like. I now knew how McKean drew Nash, and how McKean interpreted Nash’s life, but not what an actual Nash painting looked like. If you’re in a similar situation, the Tate (I assume the London museum) has a Paul Nash page with some of his art, a potted bio, and other details.

Unsurprisingly, he looks to my post-Black Dog eye a lot like a Dave McKean precursor, angular figures (very occasionally) in muted landscapes filled with heaped objects. His work, from the little I’ve seen now, is awfully quiet and still for what I’m told is a war artist: Nash’s stuff looks almost frozen to me, pictures in which usually nothing is moving and often it looks like nothing will ever move.

I have no idea what Dave McKean sees in Nash’s work: I assume entirely different things

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, since that’s how art works.

Black Dog is a biographical story: it doesn’t tell Nash’s whole life, or even the whole of his service in the war. Instead, it focuses on a recurring series of dreams he had, about a black dog, starting in childhood and ending around the end of the war. This is a book about the war, but mostly elliptically: not the flow of lives in the war, or the mass deaths, or stories of fighting, or troop movements, but individual, small moments, mostly as remembered afterward. The thoughts of someone who survived the war. But then all stories are from those who survived their wars.

I wanted to read this because I’m a fan of McKean. I missed it for five years because I suspected it was mostly for people who already knew Nash, or at least more about the Great War art scene in the UK. I was not wrong: this book was commissioned by a festival and by a project to commemorate the war a century later; it’s a book by one person for his own reasons, but it’s also a work of public art for a public purpose, made as part of public commemorations.

Many of McKean’s characters are ciphers; Nash is another one of them. We do get some answers, but much of what we see in his dreams is strange and inexplicable because they are dreams. So the more you know about Nash, and the war, and the UK at the time going in to this book

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, the better.

This is a fine thing to exist, but it is a bit chilly and a bit official, like so much public art is. It can’t shake the fact that it was commissioned, that it has a place in the world because of arts bureaucracy and a rollover of the calendar. If, like me, you knew nothing about Paul Nash going into this book, you won’t get all that much out of it.

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Reposted from The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent.