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Nicholas Cage’s The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent is Unleashed for Home

Nicholas Cage’s The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent is Unleashed for Home

SANTA MONICA, CA – Celebrate the world’s hero and prodigal movie star Nicolas Cage when The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent arrives on Digital June 7 and on 4K Ultra HD Combo Pack (plus Blu-ray and Digital), Blu-ray Combo Pack (plus DVD and Digital), DVD, and On Demand June 21 from Lionsgate. The adrenaline-fueled comedy stars Academy Award® winner Nicolas Cage (Best Actor, Leaving Las Vegas, 1995; National Treasure Franchise, Gone in 60 Seconds, The Rock), Pedro Pascal (The Mandalorian, Narcos, Game of Thrones), Sharon Horgan, Ike Barinholtz, Alessandra Mastronardi, Jacob Scipio, with Primetime Emmy® Award winner Neil Patrick Harris (Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series, Glee, 2010; How I Met Your Mother, Gone Girl, Harold & Kumar franchise), and Primetime Emmy® Award and GRAMMY Award® winner Tiffany Haddish (Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series, Saturday Night Live, 2018; Best Comedy Album, Black Mitzvah; Like a Boss, Night School, Girls Trip).

In this wildly entertaining, action-packed comedy, Oscar® winner Nicolas Cage plays…Nick Cage! Creatively unfulfilled and facing financial ruin, the fictionalized version of Cage accepts a million-dollar offer to attend the birthday of a dangerous superfan (Pedro Pascal). Things take an unexpected turn when Cage is recruited by a CIA operative (Tiffany Haddish) and he must use his legendary acting skills, channeling his most iconic and beloved characters to become a real-life action hero.
 
The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent 4K Ultra HD Combo Pack, Blu-ray Combo Pack, and DVD will be available for the suggested retail price of $42.99, $39.99, and $29.96

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, respectively. 
 
4K ULTRA HD / BLU-RAY / DIGITAL SPECIAL FEATURES  

  • Deleted Scenes (with Optional Audio Commentary by Writer-Director Tom Gormican and Writer-Executive producer Kevin Etten)
  • The Mind
    Meet the filmmakers and learn about the creative decisions behind the film. A film made with love

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    , passion, and massive talent.
  • Glimmers of a Bygone Cage
    He’s back. Not that he went anywhere. Go back in time in this behind-the-scenes featurette and relive Nicolas Cage’s journey as an actor and see how a legendary career inspired both filmmakers and cast to create a new era of Cage.
  • Everybody Needs a Javi
    Nick Cage meets his ultimate fan. Discover why Pedro Pascal was the perfect choice to play the charismatic, lovable, and eccentric fan with a dark, dangerous secret.
  • Nick, Nicky, and Sergio
    The man, the actor, the legend. Take a look inside Nicolas Cage’s mind and find out how this film is the culmination of a legendary career, but also a new beginning for one of the most versatile actors of our time.
  • Second Act Action  
    And . . . action, and more action! Immerse yourself in the exciting world of stunts and special effects that helped to create incredible, well-choreographed action sequences with the help of the latest in high technology for filmmaking.
  • Cages 5 and Up
    Don’t kids say the darndest things? What if what they said were lines from some of your favorite Nick Cage movies? We thought you’d never ask.
  • SXSW Film Festival Q&A Featuring the Cast and Filmmakers.
  • Audio Commentary by Writer-Director Tom Gormican and Writer-Executive Producer Kevin Etten

DVD SPECIAL FEATURES 

  • Deleted Scenes (with Optional Audio Commentary by Writer-Director Tom Gormican and Writer-Executive Producer Kevin Etten)
  • SXSW Film Festival Q&A Featuring the Cast and Filmmakers
  • Audio Commentary by Writer-Director Tom Gormican and Writer-Executive Producer Kevin Etten
Rain Like Hammers by Brandon Graham

Rain Like Hammers by Brandon Graham

Genre fiction in comics tends to be straightforward: it explains the world and the stakes up front, then sends a generally pretty obvious Protagonist off to Do the Thing, which far too often is Saving the World.

Brandon Graham, in his afterword to Rain Like Hammers , describes that as being like a Japanese game show where the goal is to get someone to eat a hot dog as soon as possible after waking up. And he’s not into speed-eating hot dogs.

Graham’s stories tend to start in a more leisurely fashion. His camera-eye is focused, but not insistent. Hey, look over here, it says. Something is going on; I wonder what it is?

Rain Like Hammers collects a five-issue comics story – the issues were published in the first five months of 2021, and this collection came out in August. They’re long issues, too – the book is unpaged, but I think they’re 48 pages each. So my first question is: how serialized was this? Clearly, Graham created it in five chapters, but I really doubt he did that during those five months. But those afterwords – there’s one for each issue

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, two pages each of sketchbook-style comics – do show the process of making the book; he seems to have made it in order, finishing each page in turn and not going back to rework based on better ideas later.

At one point he mentions his initial plan was to have five loosely-connected single issue stories – maybe, I think, ones that all came together in the final issue? – and that’s clear in the transition between the first two issues, which are entirely different, about entirely different people in entirely different places. But, in the end, this is mostly one story, seen from a couple of angles, with a second story as a way in and a bit of parallax later.

We start out in a mobile city, on some alien planet in some future. Eugene is new in Elephant City: he finished his schooling recently, and came here on purpose, to do some keeping-the-city-running job that Graham doesn’t explain in detail. Eugene is a bit lonely, finding his footing in a new place and new to adulthood. But he seems like a sensible, devoted person: we think will be OK, we want to trust him, he hope he will do well. His story for the first issue is mostly low-key, but something from outside this world is causing trouble for many of the animal-named crawling cities, and we see a little of that here.

The second issue begins what then seems to be the main story, and we may wonder what happened to Eugene, for many pages. (We will find out.) A supercriminal, Brik Blok, is heading to Sky Cradle, a space habitat of some kind that is the seat for the rulers of this part of human space: a group of self-selecting immortal families. We think he is dangerous, we think he is exciting, and we are not entirely sure if we are on his side.

What Brik Blok is coming to do on Sky Cradle is something we learn quickly, but we learn more and more details over time: we learn it iterated, first the headlines and then the depths, eventually getting to things Brik Blok didn’t know himself. Brik Blok’s initial plans, whatever they were, fail before he even reaches Sky Cradle: he’s in a different body, in an society he doesn’t know well, with a new uncertain ally or friend.

Brik Blok is coming to save El. Or maybe retrieve her, or maybe support her. She is young and smart and, we believe, on the side of right. She’s part of a program of “candidates” for immortality: they are tested and twisted and transformed to become more of the ruling class. We start to think we don’t like this ruling class, and start to feel more positively towards those who resist. We quickly learn she did not choose to join this program…though we learn more details later.

Rain Like Hammers is mostly the story of Brik Blok and El. Two people fighting against the power structure, or trying to – both with incomplete information at this point in their lives. (This is the kind of SF where people can live a very long time – maybe even if they’re not officially one of the “immortals” – and who they once were and what they once did could be forgotten or lost or mislaid.)

They do not foment a revolution. They are not even trying to topple the immortals: their aims are smaller, more specific than that. As I said at the beginning, this is not that kind of comic: they are not going to Do the Thing, not going to Save the World.

But they, and Eugene, may be able to save themselves, and get away.

Graham tells this story from the inside, with pages full of quiet moments and strange details of this far-future world. His SF is always deeply distinctive, with things he never explains, a big lived-in universe full of odd creatures and people, all living their own lives and wandering across his pages. He tones down the wordplay these days, especially in more serious, grounded stories like this one, but there’s still some of that joy in the complications of language.

SF that requires the reader to think about it and make up his own mind about it is rare in comics – it’s not all that common in prose, frankly. That’s what Graham does; that’s what this is. Any reader who likes that kind of SF should check it out

, or anyone who likes stories with a bit of gnarl to them.

Reposted from The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent.

Steeple, Vol. 2: The Silvery Moon by John Allison

Steeple, Vol. 2: The Silvery Moon by John Allison

As I type this, my post on the first volume of Steeple was written close to a month ago but has not yet gone live. So I am trying to space things out on this blog, but I may not be spacing them quite far enough for my own systems to work well. (Let’s hope I remember

, once that post does go live, to drop in a link here somewhere.)

In any case, this is a sequel to the first Steeple , which was written and drawn by John Allison with colors from Sarah Stern and letters from Jim Campbell. The first collection also appeared first as a five-issue series of floppy comics.

Steeple, Vol. 2: The Silvery Moon , by comparison, appeared originally on-line at Allison’s site , and is an all-Allison joint. (There is a cover by Max Sarin, presumably in an attempt to draw in the Giant Days audience.) This one collects two somewhat discrete stories, and I can even link you to those stories online, on the cheekily-titled steeple.church site: The Silvery Moon and Secret Sentai . I just noticed they were (still) there; I haven’t been as good at keeping up with Allison’s new comics there over the past couple of years as I vaguely searched for a copy of the first Steeple book to read first.

Anyway: this is set in a different corner of the Scarygoround -cum-Giant Days-iverse

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, down in the Cornish town of Tredregyn, where Rev. David Penrose upholds the glory of the Church of England by battling invading mermen every night (and doing essentially nothing vicaresque besides that) and the Magus Tom Pendennis does what he wilt at the Church of Satan down the lane, and what he wilt is generally sneaky and not always nice, but it tends not to be what one would actually call evil.

It’s more like a football rivalry than a battle for the soul of the town, honestly: the locals line up with their rooting preferences, and it seems like Satan is well in the lead, maybe because he always has the best tunes and dancing.

Our main characters are Billie Baker and Maggie Warren; the trainees in the two churches. Billie came to town for the CoE, but, through some odd events at the end of the first book, the two have switched roles, with the lusty, motorcycle-riding Maggie now assisting Rev. David and energetic and immensely good-hearted Billie now organizing community outreach for Satan.

Allison, as usual, has a decent-sized central cast, who are interestingly quirky. I don’t think these folks have gotten quite as defined as the Giant Days crew or his best Bad Machinery characters (Lottie Grote, for example), but they’ve had fewer pages to do so to date.

In any case: this is two more adventures of Billie and Maggie, one with a werewolf and one with a Japanese guy in a funny costume. They are both Allisonianly quirky and fun, and he’s filling out the details of this corner of his world nicely as he has more pages and time to do so.

I’ve said it many times: Allison is one of the most entertaining, and most distinctive, comics-makers of his generation, and his stories are always fun and always different from what anyone else is doing. How can you not want to read that? 

Reposted from The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent.

The Golden Age, Book 2 by Roxanne Moreil and Cyril Pedrosa

The Golden Age, Book 2 by Roxanne Moreil and Cyril Pedrosa

Endings are harder than beginnings: any story-teller will tell you that. So if I quibble that The Golden Age doesn’t end as well as it begins

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, I’m largely saying that it’s a story, and that’s what stories do.

Reading the second half

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, though – the graphic novel or bande dessinee The Golden Age, Book 2 , written by Roxanne Moreil and Cyril Pedrosa, and drawn by Pedrosa with some coloring support from others – there were several times my editor’s pen itched to make notes. I don’t know if these would have made the story better, but if I were involved in the creation, these are the things I would have asked.

First, Book One follows Tilda, the older child of the now-dead king of Antrevers. The beginning of Book Two looks like it might follow her younger brother, who finally gets a name (Edwald) for what I think was the first time at the very end of this book. Edwald does not become our viewpoint at any time here; this is still Tilda’s story. And maybe it had to be. But for a story about political factions and civil war, about opinions on how the world is supposed to be, about noblesse oblige and the democratic impulse, about the battle for the soul of a kingdom, something wider than just Tilda and a handful of advisors as viewpoints would have been useful. As it is, Edwald’s side is basically an evil caricature, with nothing good or positive about them, not even stability or continuity, and that feels like a lack.

Second, both books begin with the same group of peasants, standing in for the whole population of Antrevers, the ones who will be affected by all of these battles and decisions by nobles and kings. It looks like those people may be important to the action of the story, as thematically they are important: The Golden Age is the story of a transition from autocracy to something like democracy, in a very simplified sense. But they really aren’t. The masses are there to fight against each other, while the Important People stand in the center of panels to declaim and fight each other, to do the Important Things. The Golden Age says that it’s about them, but like so many supposedly-democratic works of the fantastic, the strong single person is more interesting, easier to work with narratively, than a mass of “just ordinary people.”

I like parallels; I like books to set things up and then knock them down; I like guns on mantlepieces to be taken down at just the right moment and fired. Golden Age does not quite do those things; it instead is caught up in a vague supernatural element that seems to inherently corrupt all of the autocratic rulers of Antrevers and a possibly prophetic old book of political philosophy (or is it mean to be religion? It’s presented in the manner of a religious text

, but its matter is political). Golden Age seems to want to say this mystical book is the Law of the Universe, but the actual operation of the magical things here is deeply obscure: are they set up by a god or gods? were they the embodied power of the ancient kings who stole power from the masses? were they self-generated somehow? are they actually operating against each other, as they seem to be, or is there some deeper balance underneath them?

So, anyway, there’s a magical box and a magical book. The book is supposed to be in the box, but the box seems to be the source of all the bad stuff and the book the source of all the good stuff, so thematically, locking the good stuff inside the bad is a weird metaphor.

I should be clear, after going so deeply into the weeds: this is the subtext, and only occasionally reaches the level of text. The story here is that Tilda’s tired, mostly unpaid, deeply fragile army is besieging Edwald’s castle, and not doing well. Tilda has had a vision of victory, and is utterly uncompromising in that vision, but does not seem to notice ways that the actual world does not line up with her visions. Meanwhile, another army loyal to Edwald is on its way: Tilda’s forces need to win quickly, or will lose forever. And she’s already shattered most of their strength in repeated pointless assaults on a portion of the curtain wall she is sure her forces can break.

So the story is about the siege, and the fight, and who lives and who dies, and how they kill each other. The big ending includes the book and the box, and whatever magics they have. And, as I said, it works pretty well but feels not quite as crisp as it should be to me.

Pedrosa, though, gives us another set of absolutely gorgeous pages, striking in their vibrant colors and stunning in their energy. That makes up for any gaps in the themes: the book powers over any possible quibbles through pure visual power, culminating in a stunning phantasmagorical conclusion. 

Reposted from The Antick Musings of G.B.H. Hornswoggler, Gent.

REVIEW: Uncharted

REVIEW: Uncharted

Tom Holland has proven a charming actor, capable of poignancy, humor, and super-heroic action. Stretching beyond his work as Spider-Man, he detoured into an adaptation of the Uncharted video game, coming off more as a cross between Indiana Jones and James Bond than an original character, which is not at all his fault. He is an appealing performer and you want to root for him to succeed.

The PS3 game this is based on works fine as a video game and its sequels (or so I’m told, I don’t have time for video games) but the simplified storytelling conventions for a video game need to be expanded and evolved for filmed entertainment. Here, screenwriters Rafe Lee Judkins, Art Marcum, and Matt Holloway (working from a story by Judkins, Jon Hanley Rosenberg, and Mark D. Walker) let the fine cast and their audience down.

Bartender cum thief Nathan Drake (Holland) is recruited by Victor Sullivan (Mark Wahlberg) to help locate a hidden treasure. A treasure that Santiago Moncada (Antonio Banderas) thinks belongs to his family so you can see the conflict coming a mile away.

There are some lively set pieces that show Spider-Man prepared Holland for the stunt work and he sells the bits and pieces. Director Ruben Fleischer is just fine working with action as seen in his previous films

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, Zombieland and Gangster Squad but as seen with his two Venom films, doesn’t recognize storytelling weaknesses in the script, demanding better. He brings a visual flair without a tremendous amount of attention paid to characterization. As a result, the thrills are there but the emotional connection to the stakes and characters are absent.

Some credit for how effective the film is goes to producers Charles Roven, who made fine contributions to DC’s filmed heroes, and Avi Arad who got things rolling with 2000’s Spider-Man film.

This is a visually interesting film given all the locales, very much Bond-inspired. You can see why some are lobbying for him to be the next 007, although I suspect he’s too young and too pretty to fulfill Ian Fleming’s description.

Anyway, this is a passable evening’s entertainment and little more although it could have been.

Sony Home Entertainment has released this in the usual formats including the reliable Blu-ray/DVD/Digital HD combo. The 1080 p transfer is just fine for home viewing, letting you see all the details, without annoying distractions. The

Uncharted Blu-ray, Audio Quality   4.5 of 5 DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 soundtrack is up to the challenge, easily matching the visuals.

The film performed well enough at the box office although pre-Covid I suspect it would have been deemed a disappointing

, coming as it did a mere two months after Spider-Man: No Way Home. Holland’s coat tails may not be long enough yet.  This may explain why the special features are perfunctory.

We have Deleted & Extended Scenes (10:23); Never a Dull Moment: Stunts & Action (5:54); Becoming Nathan Drake (3:59); Audio Commentary: Director Ruben Fleischer; Villains, Backstabbers, & Accomplices (4:20); Charting the Course: On Set with Ruben Fleischer (4:28); The Buddy System (3:49); Big Action Breakdown: C-17 Globemaster (5:03): Music Video (1080p, 2:38): and the music video “No Mind” by Milkblood.

REVIEW: Heavy Metal

REVIEW: Heavy Metal

Unsuspecting comic book readers raised on the EC-inspired black and white horror magazines from Warren Publishing had no idea what to make of Heavy Metal when it debuted on American newsstands in 1977. We came to understand it was a domestic version of France’s wildly successful Metal Hurlant, and introduced us to European talents and storytelling. It was mind-blowing.

The magazine’s success led to an animated feature, released in the summer of 1981, heralded by the beautiful Chris Achilléos promotional poster image

, introducing us to Taarna, who has become the magazine’s unofficial mascot and most recognizable figure.

The film, like the magazine, was a series of animated shorts, an anthology of science fiction, and fantasy, with heavy dollops of violence, nudity, and heavy metal music. And like the magazine, it was beautiful to look at and occasionally made sense.

It opened to mixed reviews and modest success, leading to the less enchanting Heavy Metal 2000. Both have been restored and re-released in a fine box set from Sony Home Entertainment.

For the record, the film consists of:

“Soft Landing” adapted by Dan O’Bannon (Blue Thunder) and Thomas Warkentin (Star Trek comic strip), from their own story. This leads into “Grimaldi”, continuing the tale.

“Harry Canyon” is adapted from Moebius’ The Long Tomorrow by Daniel Goldberg and Len Blum, with music from Blue Öyster Cult, Donald Fagen, Stevie Nicks, Journey, and Riggs.

Richard Corben’s classic “Den” is brought to life here and is one of the best looking segments of the film. John Candy is surprisingly good providing Den’s voice.

Bernie Wrightson’s “Captain Sternn” follows in an original story after the hero debuted in the magazine a year earlier. Young Eugene Levy voices Captain Lincoln F. Sternn and John Vernon is his Prosecutor.

“B-17” is an original from O’Bannon with music from Don Felder.

Angus McKie adapts his own “So Beautiful & So Dangerous” with vocal work from Candy, Levy, and Harold Ramis. Music here comes from Grand Funk Railroad, Cheap Trick, Nazareth, Fleder, Trust, and Sammy Hagar.

“Taarna” closes out the film, adapted from Moebius’ Arzach by Daniel Goldberg and Len Blum. This sword and sorcery/SF tale is accompanied by music from Black Sabbath and Devo.

The film is loosely connected by an orb called Loc-Nar (voiced by the stentorian Percy Rodriguez) and it sort of works as does the entire movie. The uneven quality is a result of multiple animation houses simultaneously working on the film and there’s even one sequence that was cut because of time constraints.

It’s a time capsule of story and music so worth a look in that regard. The magazine’s heyday was over within a few years of the film’s release and it wasn’t until two years ago it regained any notoriety thanks to new management. (Ful disclosure, CEO Matt Medney and I co-wrote a novel coming out in October.)

The film has been lovingly restored in both 4k Ultra HD and Blu-ray. The animation is crisp, the color palette subtle and bold where it needs to be. This is one of the better-animated transfers I have seen. Accompanied by the swell Dolby Atmos soundtrack, every electric guitar thrum and synthesizer is nicely balanced with the effects and dialogue.

The combo pack comes with Heavy Metal in both 4k and Blu-ray and just a Blu-ray of Heavy Metal 2000. The special features from the previous Blu-ray release remain intact with the addition of Heavy Metal: A Look Back (9:20) as producers Ivan Reitman and Norman Reedus, geek Kevin Smith, actress Ebony Jeanette, screenwriter Matthew Klickstein, and HM CEO Matthew Medney chat it up. The other features include: Heavy Metal: Feature Length Rough Cut (1:30:21); Deleted Scenes (8:42); and, Imagining Heavy Metal (35:39).

Friday the 13th Part 3 gets Steelbook Treatment ; Jason’s Debut gets 4K Release

Friday the 13th Part 3 gets Steelbook Treatment ; Jason’s Debut gets 4K Release

FRIDAY THE 13TH PART 3

In celebration of its 40th anniversary in 2022, Friday the 13th Part 3 is now available in a Limited-Edition Blu-ray™ SteelBook®.  This killer edition includes the 2D version of the film, which was remastered in 2020 from original film elements, along with access to a digital copy of the film and a host of previously released bonus content.  

In this installment, a new crop of campers plays a deadly game of cat-and-mouse with the maniacal Jason, who acquires what will become his iconic mask from an unlucky victim.

FRIDAY THE 13TH

In addition, the original Friday the 13thcomes to 4K Ultra HD on September 13, 2022, in time for Halloween viewing.  One of the most iconic horror films of all time

Friday the 13th launched the long-running and wildly popular franchise, which has grossed over $466 million worldwide.   The 4K Ultra HD release features HDR-10 and Dolby Vision® and includes both the theatrical and unrated versions of the film, access to a digital copy, and extensive legacy bonus content.

The thrills start when a new owner and several young counselors gather to reopen Camp Crystal Lake, despite locals’ warnings that the place has a “death curse.” One by one, they find out how unlucky Friday the 13th can be as they are stalked by a violent killer.

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New Top Gun Website Assigns your Call Sign

New Top Gun Website Assigns your Call Sign

With Paramount Pictures’ Top Gun: Maverick opening May 27, the PR machine has gone into overdrive. They have launched a new website that will use AR and a quiz to determine what your call sign will be should you wish to soar the skies like Maverick.

OFFICIAL SYNOPSIS

After more than thirty years of service as one of the Navy’s top aviators, Pete “Maverick” Mitchell (Tom Cruise) is where he belongs, pushing the envelope as a courageous test pilot and dodging the advancement in rank that would ground him. When he finds himself training a detachment of TOPGUN graduates for a specialized mission the likes of which no living pilot has ever seen, Maverick encounters Lt. Bradley Bradshaw (Miles Teller), call sign: “Rooster,” the son of Maverick’s late friend and Radar Intercept Officer Lt. Nick Bradshaw

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, aka “Goose.”

Facing an uncertain future and confronting the ghosts of his past, Maverick is drawn into a confrontation with his own deepest fears, culminating in a mission that demands the ultimate sacrifice from those who will be chosen to fly it. 

DIRECTED BY

Joseph Kosinski

SCREENPLAY BY

Ehren Kruger and Eric Warren Singer and Christopher McQuarrie

STORY BY

Peter Craig and Justin Marks

BASED ON CHARACTERS CREATED BY

Jim Cash & Jack Epps

, Jr.

PRODUCED BY

Jerry Bruckheimer, Tom Cruise

, Christopher McQuarrie, David Ellison

EXECUTIVE PRODUCED BY

 Tommy Harper, Dana Goldberg, Don Granger,

Chad Oman, Mike Stenson

STARRING

Tom Cruise, Miles Teller, Jennifer Connelly, Jon Hamm, Glen Powell, Lewis Pullman, Charles Parnell, Bashir Salahuddin, Monica Barbaro, Jay Ellis, Danny Ramirez, Greg Tarzan Davis with Ed Harris and Val Kilmer

The Lost City Finds its way Home in May, July

The Lost City Finds its way Home in May, July

HOLLYWOOD, Calif. – Discover thrilling adventure, fabled treasure, and epic laughs when the hit comedy The Lost City finds its way home for purchase on Digital starting May 10, 2022. The film will arrive on 4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray, and DVD July 26 from Paramount Home Entertainment.

Starring Sandra Bullock, Channing Tatum, Daniel Radcliffe, and Da’Vine Joy Randolph, this “fun & wild jungle adventure comedy” (Erik Davis, Fandango) is “a hilarious adventure from start to finish” (Dorian Parks, Geeks of Color). Fans can enjoy The Lost City at home on Digital*, 4K Ultra HD, or Blu-ray and get over 50 minutes of fun-filled bonus content, including hilarious bloopers, deleted scenes not seen in theaters, and multiple behind-the-scenes featurettes. Take a trip to the movie’s exotic filming location, see how the incredible action set pieces were filmed

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, discover the story behind the infamous jumpsuit, and much more!

Bonus content is detailed below:
• Deleted Scenes—More fun you didn’t see in theatres!
• Bloopers—Laugh along with the cast at their hilarious on-set bloopers
• Dynamic Duo—Behind-the-scenes fun with Sandra Bullock and Channing Tatum to see how their comedy chemistry perfectly aligns for this odd-couple comedy adventure
• Location Profile—Take a trip to the exotic Dominican Republic movie location and find out how the crew dealt with heavy rain and mosquitos!
• Jungle Rescue—See how the movie’s incredible action set pieces and crazy stunts were filmed
• The Jumpsuit—Discover what went into designing Loretta’s eye-catching purple sequin jumpsuit
• Charcuterie—A hilarious breakdown of Loretta’s big kidnapping scene and what it’s like to come under attack from a giant charcuterie board!
• The Villains of The Lost City —Meet the bad guys: Abigail Fairfax and his henchmen
• Building The Lost City —A look at building the film’s incredible island world
The Lost City DVD includes the feature film in standard definition.

The Lost City synopsis
Loretta Sage’s (Sandra Bullock) novels are filled with ancient tombs and daring adventures

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, but that doesn’t mean she’s prepared for them in real life. When she is kidnapped by an eccentric billionaire (Daniel Radcliffe) to locate a legendary lost city, Loretta’s handsome cover model, Alan (Channing Tatum), sets off on a heroic but hapless rescue mission. Thrust into an epic thrill-ride through the jungle, the unlikely pair must work together to survive the elements, and survive each other, to find the city’s fabled treasure before it’s lost forever.

Music Supervisor ROB LOWRY Music by PINAR TOPRAK
Costume Designer MARLENE STEWART Edited by CRAIG ALPERT, ACE
Production Designer JIM BISSELL Director of Photography JONATHAN SELA
Executive Producers JJ HOOK DANA FOX JULIA GUNN
Produced by LIZA CHASIN, p.g.a. SANDRA BULLOCK, p.g.a. SETH GORDON
Story by SETH GORDON Screenplay by OREN UZIEL and DANA FOX and ADAM NEE & AARON NEE
Directed by ADAM NEE and AARON NEE

The Lost City
Street Dates: May 10, 2022 (Digital)
July 26, 2022 (4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray, DVD)
U.S. Rating: PG-13 for violence and some bloody images, suggestive material, partial nudity and language

*Availability of bonus content varies by digital retailer

Legends of Tomorrow: The Seventh and Final Season Soars onto Disc in July

Legends of Tomorrow: The Seventh and Final Season Soars onto Disc in July

BURBANK

, CA – Everyone’s favorite Super Heroes need to get back to the future as Warner Bros. Home Entertainment releases DC’s Legends of Tomorrow: The Seventh and Final Season on Blu-ray and DVD July 19, 2022. DC’s Legends of Tomorrow: The Seventh and Final Season features all 13 epic episodes with special features including deleted scenes and a gag reel. The set is priced to own at $24.98 SRP for the DVD ($29.98 in Canada) and $29.98 for the Blu-ray ($39.99 in Canada) and is also available to own on Digital via purchase from all major digital retailers.

After saving the planet from an alien invasion last season, the Legends deserve a break. Too bad their time travel ship, the Waverider, gets blown up by a second Waverider…meaning the Legends are now trapped in 1925 Odessa, Texas! The only way to get home, and get payback on their mysterious new enemy, is to journey across the country to an early pioneer of time travel, who might just be their only hope of returning home. But with no Waverider, no way of knowing how they’re impacting the timeline, and a time-traveling foe hunting them, this will be the toughest mission yet for the Legends.

DC’s Legends of Tomorrow stars Caity Lotz (Arrow, Mad Men), Tala Ashe (Smash, The Carrie Diaries), Jes Macallan (Mistresses, Shameless), Olivia Swann (Doctors), Adam Tsekhman (The Twilight Zone), Shayan Sobhian (The Chosen), Lisseth Chavez (Chicgago P.D.)and Amy Louise Pemberton (Arrow, Suspense), with Nick Zano (What I Like About You), and Matt Ryan (Constantine).

Based on the DC characters, DC’s Legends of Tomorrow is produced by Berlanti Productions in association with Warner Bros. Television, with executive producers Greg Berlanti (Batwoman, The Flash, Supergirl, Black Lightning, Riverdale)Phil Klemmer (Chuck, Political Animals),Keto Shimizu (Arrow), James Eagan (Ash vs. Evil Dead), Ray Utarnachitt (The Tomorrow People)and Sarah Schechter (Arrow, The Flash, Supergirl, Black Lightning, Riverdale).

BLU-RAY AND DVD FEATURES

  • Gag Reel (Exclusive to Blu-ray and DVD)
  • Deleted Scenes (Exclusive to Blu-ray and DVD)
  • Captain at the Helm: DC’s Legends of Tomorrow 100th Episode

13 ONE-HOUR EPISODES

1.   The Bullet Blondes

2.   The Need for Speed

3.   WVRDR_ERROR_100<Oest-of-th3-Gs.gid30n>NotFound

4.   Speakeasy Does It

5.   It’s a Mad

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, Mad, Mad, Mad Scientist

6.   Deus Ex Latrina

7.   A Woman’s Place is in the War Effort!

8.   Paranoid Android

9.   Lowest Common Demoninator

10. The Fixed Point

11. Rage Against the Machines

12. Too Legit to Quit

13. Knocked Down, Knocked Up

DIGITAL

DC’s Legends of Tomorrow: The Seventh and Final Season is available to own on Digital. Digital purchase allows consumers to instantly stream and download all episodes to watch anywhere and anytime on their favorite devices. Digital movies and TV shows are available from various digital retailers including Amazon Video, iTunes, Google Play, Vudu and others.

BASICS

Street Date: July 19, 2022

BD and DVD Presented in 16×9 widescreen format

Running Time: Feature: Approx. 546 min

Enhanced Content: Approx. 79 min

DVD

Price: $24.98 SRP ($29.98 in Canada)

3-Discs (3 DVD-9s)

Audio – English (5.1)

Subtitles – English SDH

BLU-RAY

Price: $29.98 SRP ($39.99 in Canada)

3-Discs (3 BD-50s)

Audio – DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 – English

BD Subtitles – English SDH