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Natalie Portman’s Lucy in the Sky Lands on Digital Dec. 17

Natalie Portman’s Lucy in the Sky Lands on Digital Dec. 17

LOS ANGELES, CA (December 3, 2019) – From Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment comes Noah Hawley’s feature directorial debut, LUCY IN THE SKY, arriving on Digital December 17.

Natalie Portman and Jon Hamm star in this captivating drama inspired by true events ripped from the headlines. After star astronaut Lucy Cola (Portman) earns a coveted spot on a NASA mission, she’s moved by the transcendence of being in space. But when she returns to Earth, her everyday life feels too small. Soon, she engages in a reckless love triangle that threatens her career and her sanity.

The LUCY IN THE SKY Digital release is packed with bonus materials, including four deleted scenes, as well as four making-of featurettes.

LUCY IN THE SKY Digital HD Bonus Features:

  • Deleted Scenes:
    • “Lucy Teaches”
    • “Mark Takes Lucy to the Roof”
    • “Lucy Leaves Erin in the Simulator”
    • “Lucy and Iris Get Pulled Over”
  • Director’s Journey
  • Creating Magical Realism
  • Making Space
  • Lucy Cola

LUCY IN THE SKY Digital HD Specifications
Street Date:                 December 17, 2019
Screen Format:           Widescreen 16:9
Audio:                         English DTS-HD MA 5.1, English AD 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, French Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:                     English for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Spanish, French
Total Run Time:         124 Minutes
Rating:                        R for language and some sexual content

Dorothy (D.C.) Fontana: 1939-2019

Dorothy (D.C.) Fontana: 1939-2019

Dorothy (D.C.) Fontana: 1939-2019Dorothy Catherine (D.C.) Fontana passed away peacefully last evening at the age of 80 after a brief illness.

Ms. Fontana gained global notoriety for her writing and story editing on the 1960’s television series Star Trek, as well as the 1970’s animated series, which she also associate produced. Her myth­-building work on classic Trek blazed a trail for women, not only in television, but also in science fiction. Her well-known screen credit kept the fact of her gender a secret from most fans until they saw her picture in Stephen Whitfield’s The Making of Star Trek, one of the “bibles” of classic Trekker fandom.

Dorothy Fontana was responsible for creating Spock’s childhood history, including the essential story “Yesteryear,” which though produced for Star Trek: The Animated Series, is as powerful as the best episodes of the classic series. She established the characters of, and relationship between, Spock’s father and mother (Sarek and Amanda) in classic Trek’s “Journey to Babel” episode. It was Ms. Fontana’s development of the rare emotional travails of a half-human, half-Vulcan child … and adult (full of emotions, yet prohibited from expressing them), that made Spock such a unique character in the history of film and television.

Ms. Fontana shared writing credit with Gene Roddenberry on “Encounter at Farpoint,” the feature-length premiere for Star Trek: The Next Generation, which was nominated for a Hugo Award. She penned further episodes of ST: TNG, and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Her last produced writing credit was an episode of the web-based series Star Trek: New Voyages entitled “To Serve All My Days,” which starred classic Trek’s Chekov, Walter Koenig.

Ms. Fontana’s writing credits also include episodes of: Then Came Bronson (her script, “Two Percent of Nothing,” co-written with Denne Bart Petitclerc, was nominated for a WGA Award); Ben Casey; The
Wild, Wild West; The Big Valley; Bonanza, The Six Million Dollar Man; Land of the Lost; The Streets of San Francisco; Kung Fu; The Waltons; Dallas; Buck Rogers in the 25th Century; Babylon 5; and the documentary, Bob Burns’ Hollywood Halloween (shared with Bob & Kathy Bums). Though best known for her television work, D.C. Fontana also wrote novels – including Trek’s “Vulcan’s Glory,” and “The Questor Tapes,” based on a pilot by Roddenberry. She also wrote a Trek comic book, and several video games, primarily in the science fiction genre.

For decades, Ms. Fontana was an ardent and active member of the Writers Guild of America, west, having served on its Board of Directors for two terms. She twice won the prestigious Morgan Cox award for Guild service: first in 1997 (shared with members of the Property Planning Committee), and again by herself in 2002. Recorded interviews with her from the Writers Guild and the TV Academy (among others) are available online.

Most recently employed as a senior lecturer at the American Film Institute, Ms. Fontana devotedly taught and mentored many classes of aspiring screenwriters, producers and directors by sharing a lifetime of expertise, craft, heart and integrity.

Dorothy (D.C.) Fontana was born in New Jersey in 1939, and is survived by her husband, Oscar-winning visual effects cinematographer Dennis Skotak. Please respect the family’s privacy. Send memorial donations to the Humane Society (www.humanesociety.org), Best Friends Animal Society (www.bestfriends.org), or the American Film Institute (www.afi.com).

Irene Adler Gets a Comic

Irene Adler gets her own League of Extraordinary Gentlewomen

Titan Comics has announced Adler, a five-issue miniseries starting in February 2020 starring the only woman to ever best Sherlock Holmes, teaming her up with “famous Victorian heroines from science, history, and literature… such as Jane Eyre, Lady Havisham, Marie Curie, Carmilla, and Ayesha” to defeat Moriarty.

Comics Worth Reading has a preview and a recap of who’s who:

Irene Adler, the only woman to outwit Sherlock Holmes, appeared in one 1891 story, “A Scandal in Bohemia”. She’s been a favorite ever since, particularly with people who want to pair Holmes up romantically in a traditional fashion.

Lady Havisham is from Great Expectations, the crazy spinster in her wedding dress in a ruined mansion. Carmilla is a vampire who appeared 26 years before Dracula. Ayesha is the She written by H. Rider Haggard.

If you need me to explain Jane Eyre or Marie Curie to you, you are clearly not the audience for this story.

Originally at comicsworthreading.com

Go click through and see the preview.

Love: A Comic Book Story

Love: A Comic Book Story

Ask 20 people to define “Love”, you’ll get 20 definitions.

Here’s mine.

I feel love is measured in how you’re treated when things go wrong, not when everything is okay. It’s one thing to say something in a joyous ceremony yet another when faced with real life. People tend to balk the moment it gets real. “It’s you and me forever” converts to, “It’s not you; it’s me.”

People leave.

Some can stick it out for years. Some go the first time things get stormy. Whatever vows spoken to whatever God is forgotten when one person has reached their limit.

Movies books and music make love seem like ‘happily ever after’ is assured. Pop Culture emphasizes the easily overcome struggle to stay with someone who has fallen on hard times or is stricken with a debilitating or fatal illness.

People do it, but it is far from easy. Trust me, I know.

I wrote about such a love affair in IF & HOPE.

The love affair of Roz Alexander-Kasparik and David Rector was the stuff of movies and books, but as we all know, ‘happily ever after’ isn’t as easy as Hollywood makes it look like.

David suffered an aortic dissection a tear in a major blood vessel and various complications left him unable to speak or walk.

Roz stayed.

Long years of struggle is an common complaint.

The years couldn’t have been long enough for Roz. She was in love in the truest sense of the word. She vowed to stay until the end. What end?

The end of days, the end of the world, the end of time. Whatever end would take her away from David. She just knew it would not be her that would end the relationship.

The end came for David earlier this month. His death leaving a hole in Roz’s world she thinks may be impossible to fill.

Roz called David her “heart.” You cannot live without your heart. So it’s good that David’s presence will endure his legacy one of strength and persistence, giving Roz hope.

Hope isn’t something one wants to hear about when faced with the kind of pain Roz is feeling now. I know that and the following isn’t about hope its about truth.

Roz, there are no words I can write that can convey the impact both David and yourself had on me. I will miss David’s unique “melody” at the Black Panel and the intense look he gave me communicating with his eyes what he couldn’t with voice. I will miss talking with you by phone and feeling like David was part of the discussion when you translated his sounds.

Few things impress me, fewer I envy. Your relationship with David did both.

You’re one of the strongest people I know. I hope your pain is tempered, knowing the impression David made on many. With David by your side you  fought for the rights of those burdened with disadvantages. Without David it will be hard but I know that will continue.

I don’t need to hope there is no if-this I know.

Just like I know the comic you created with David, Recall & Given will become a reality.

It’s also a given.

Ed Catto’s Black Friday Gift Guide!

Ed Catto’s Black Friday Gift Guide!

Beyond the toys, eggnog and family time, a nostalgic part the Yuletide season for me are books about comics.  When I was growing up, there were just a few : Batman from the 30s to the 70s, Les Daniels’ Comix, Stan Lee’s Origins of Marvel Comics.  But boy, did they make an impression on me.  Today there’s a plethora of spectacular books available. Here’s a few of the best ones for your gift list consideration:

KIRBY & LEE: STUF’ SAID! : THE COMPLEX GENESIS of the MARVEL UNIVERSE 

by John Morrow and Jon B. Cooke, Twomorrows

I really enjoyed A MARVELOUS LIFE: THE AMAZING STORY OF STAN LEE by Danny Fingeroth. Somehow, Fingeroth seemed to thread the needle to deliver a fascinating book and thoroughly explores the myth versus the man.

But there’s two sides to every story, and that’s the approach that John Morrow took in this brilliant book, STUF’ SAID.  This book serves up a detailed step-by-step, quote-by-quote walk through the early days (and beyond) of the Marvel Universe. Morrow analyzes the roles of not only Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, but so many of the creators involved with the birth of Marvel.

For longtime fans, there’s a lot of nostalgia and new information. For new fans, it’s a balanced look at the real-life characters behind the fictional characters they love.

STAR TREK SHIPYARDS STARFLEET STARSHIPS: The Encyclopedia of Starfleet Ships Plus NCC1701 Enterprise

by Ben Robinson and Marcus Reilly, Eaglemoss

Books are great, but when you throw in a toy or two they are even better. Eaglemoss’ thorough book, STAR TREK SHIPYARDS  is a chronological history (even though it’s all about the future) of the Starfleet starshipsThis edition includes a specially packaged with a die-cast collectible, the iconic U.S.S. Enterprise.

This book has it all – from the most obscure ships to the recent additions to the mythology from the STAR TREK: DISCOVERY series.

HASHTAG: DANGER: PANIC ON DINOSAUR MOUNTAIN!

Written by Tom Peyer, Art by Chris Giarrusso and Richard Case.  Cover by Richard Williams, AHOY! Comics

As Tom Peyer says, this collected edition is “Twice the colons! Half the Thrills”. HASHTAG: DANGER is a wickedly funny take on adventurer comics, like Fantastic Four or Challengers of the Unknown. Peyer, always acerbic and witty, starts at “11” and turns up the dial from there.  At the same time, he is somehow able to let his authentic love of the source material shine though. The humor never seems mean-spirited.

Richard Williams, the celebrated MAD artist, brings an element of pseudo realism liberally mixed with kooky absurdity to the covers.

This trade paperback collects all the irreverent HASHTAG: DANGER stories from issues #1-5 of the AHOY! Comics series, plus the back-features from other AHOY! titles like HIGH HEAVEN and CAPTAIN GINGER.

ROD SERLING: HIS LIFE, WORK AND IMAGINATION

by Nick Parisi, University of Mississippi Press

Nick Parisi’s Rod Serling biography isn’t only for fans of The Twilight Zone. It’s also for fans of early television,  scriptwriting and Planet of the Apes. And somehow, Parisi finds a way to celebrate Serling as a persistent entrepreneur – both winning and losing creative and economic battles.  A great read!

STRONGHOLD Vol. 1

Written by Phil Hester Art by Ryan Kelly, Aftershock

Phil Hester’s written a lot of great comics over the years, and Stronghold is another great one. It’s a quirky, creepy take on the Superman legend. This thriller reveals a clandestine organization that monitors the world’s most powerful man. This series blends a conspiracy feel mixed with an us-against-the-world vibe to create a compelling series.

FRESH HELL IN FITS

by Steve Cerio, Psychofon Records

Steve Cerio, a creative innovator and gallery artist who blossomed as part of the old NYC Comix scene, is back with another trippy book.  His newest  is subtitled “A False History of The Residents”, but the imaginative illustrations appeal to art lovers beyond that band’s fan base.  Fresh Hell in Fits is also  available as a special signed collector’s edition (only 33 copies) complete with extra goodies.

This book is best found at the Psychofon Records site: https://www.psychofonrecords.com

BATMAN: THE DEFINITIVE HISTORY OF THE DARK KNIGHT IN COMICS, FILM AND BEYOND

by Andrew Farago and Gina McIntyre, Insight Editions

This is the type of the book that you start in the morning, and when you look up again it’s getting close to bedtime.  This lovingly thorough history of Batman touches all the bases, provides new information and is loaded with goodies.  I must admit it’s a thrill to be reading about the Batman mobile from 1950s comics, and then to fold-out a set of blueprints.

$75.00 various levels 400 pp. • hardcover  • ISBN-10: 1683834372


Have a fantastic Yuletide season, everyone!

Howard Cruse: 1944-2019

Howard Cruse: 1944-2019

Howard Cruse, author of the acclaimed graphic novel Stuck Rubber Baby and founding editor of the anthology Gay Comix, died Tuesday of cancer at the age of 75, Cruse’s daughter Kimberly Kolze Venter announced.

Cruse came to prominence in the 1970s with the strip Barefootz, which appeared in a number of underground magazines and titles, but it was the 1980s title Gay Comix — an anthology created by Cruse to publish work by openly gay creators — that arguably made his reputation. Wendel, his strip about a young gay man in Reagan’s America for The Advocate during the same period, won him even more acclaim.

But he may be best known for Stuck Rubber Baby, which told the story of Toland Polk, a gas station attendant in the American South of the 1960s who gets caught up in the civil rights struggle of the period as he explores his own sexuality. The book, originally published by DC’s Paradox Press imprint, went on to win Eisner and Harvey Awards, and was nominated for both the America Library Association’s Lesbian and Gay Book Award as well as the Lambda Literary Award, and is scheduled for a 25th anniversary release next year from First Second Books.

For those of us in the ComicMix family, it’s personal. We saw Howard often at Martha’s famous holiday party, and were always happy to share donuts and conversation with him. We hope he’s found that great Purchaser’s Clearing House in the sky…

…what, you don’t know about the Purchaser’s Clearing House? Why, let Howard tell you all about it! Maestro?

Diamond sends letter to retailers about data breach

Diamond sends letter to retailers about data breach

Ouch. FirstComicsNews has the details

On November 22, 2019, a Diamond Retailer Services Representative mistakenly appended an internal reference document to an email that went to approximately 200 retailers. The document contained account contact information and partial sales data for our customer base, including your store’s information.

Originally at www.firstcomicsnews.com

This could get embarrassing quickly…

A Marvel comic book just sold for a record $1.26 million

Marvel Comics #1 just sold for a record $1.26 million

80 years to increase over twelve million times in value. That’s a nice markup.

It’s rare to find an almost-perfect copy of Marvel Comics’ first comic book, aptly named “Marvel Comics 1.” But one in near-mint condition just sold for a record $1.26 million.

It’s the “finest known copy” of the comic book, according to Heritage Auctions, which handled the bidding. It’s also the most anyone has ever paid for a comic from Marvel Comics, it said.

The comic book was first released on October 1, 1939, and it introduced fans to characters including the Human Torch, Angel, Sub-Mariner and the Masked Raider.

Originally at www.cnn.com

It had expect to go as high as $1 million, but then they found out the Mylar sleeve was included.

The previous Marvel Comics record holder was a copy of Amazing Fantasy #15 (released in 1962, marking the world debut of Spider-Man), which brought in $1.1 million at auction in 2011.

The all-time record holder for any comic book sold at auction was an original printing of Action Comics #1 (the first appearance of Superman, also published in 1939), which went for $3.2 million on eBay in 2014.

Albany firefighters investigating cause of comic book store fire

This is why you shouldn’t name your store “Phoenix Comics”

An investigation is underway to determine the cause of a fire at an Albany comic book store.

Around 7:15 p.m. Friday, Albany firefighters and Dougherty County EMS responded to a fire at Phoenix Comics, located in the shopping plaza in the 1100 block of North Westover Boulevard.

Upon arrival, flames and smoke were visible; the fire quickly extinguished.

Originally at wfxl.com

We’re glad no one was hurt, and we hope they rise from the ashes soon.