Tagged: Science Fiction

Science Fiction/Fantasy Interviews

Science Fiction/Fantasy Interviews

The LA Times profiles “the Dean of Science Fiction,” Robert A Heinlein, in preparation for the 100th anniversary of his birth on Saturday.

Michael Cassutt’s new column at SciFi Weekly is also about Heinlein, and gives more details of the Heinlein Centennial going on this coming weekend in Kansas City (Heinlein’s birthplace).

 

The Globe and Mail lists and profiles Canada’s “best-kept secrets in the arts” – among them, Hugo-winning science fiction writer Robert Charles Wilson.

 

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In Memoriam: Sterling Lanier

In Memoriam: Sterling Lanier

Jane Jewell, Executive Director of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, has received word of the death of Sterling Lanier on Thursday, June 28th at the age of 79.

Sterling Edmund Lanier worked as both a writer and editor in the science fiction field beginning in the early 1960s; he was published extensively in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, especially with his "Brigadier Ffellowes" club stories. As an editor, he worked for Chilton for various periods in the ’60s, and, most famously, was responsible for the book publication of Frank Herbert’s Dune in 1965. Starting in the 1970s, he worked mostly on a freelance basis, as a sculptor, jeweler, and writer.

His best-known novel is his second, Hiero’s Journey (1973), an adventure story set in a far-future world long after a nuclear war. Its sequel, The Unforsaken Hiero (1983), was nearly as popular with SF readers. Speculation about a possible third Hiero book continued, but Lanier had no new publications, or substantial contact with the SF field, since the mid-80s.

He had spent recent years in Florida with his wife, Ann.

Paizo’s Planet Stories Plunges into Pure Pulp!

Paizo’s Planet Stories Plunges into Pure Pulp!

You’d need to have a very long memory to remember the heyday of the original Planet Stories magazine, since it closed down in 1955. It was a pulp magazine – in both senses of the word “pulp.” But the name has lingered ever since, whispered at last call at convention bars to describe a certain kind of Science Fiction story – one where the science isn’t too complicated, and never gets in the way of the plot. One where the women are gorgeous and scantily clad, where the men are strongly-thewed (and often also scantily clad), and where the villains are black-hearted scoundrels out to rule their worlds. One where the blasters are hot, the ships have fins, and countless alien worlds are just waiting for the right blonde-haired American boy to become their new warlord. You know: the fun stuff.

Paizo Publishing, a rogue satellite that careened out of the Wizards of the Coast orbit some years back, has come up with a diabolical scheme to bring back the Planet Stories name. But this time it won’t be a magazine – Paizo is launching a new book line starting in August. Many of the novels in the new Planet Stories imprint will be drawn from the era of the original Planet Stories, and all will follow the original’s ethos of “Strange Adventures on Other Worlds.”

The new Planet Stories begins with Gary Gygax’s 1992 novel The Anubis Murders, a game-flavored alternate-world story about a sorcerous detective that makes up in extra pulp what it lacks in age. Also in August is a collection of tales about one of Robert E. Howard’s lesser-known barbarian sword-swingers, Almuric. Then in September comes Michael Moorcock’s City of the Beast, the first in a swashbuckling Edgar Rice Burroughs pastiche trilogy from the mid-1960s. In October comes the first bona fide classic of the list, C.L. Moore’s eerie masterpiece Black God’s Kiss, collecting all of the “Jirel of Joiry” stories, including one rare tale in which the warrior-woman Jirel meets Moore’s other famous creation, the science fictional adventurer Northwest Smith.

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Breaking: 2007 Nebula awards announced

Breaking: 2007 Nebula awards announced

And people complained about how late the Oscars go– this ceremony finished up at 12:30 AM. I can only assume toastmaster Ronald D. Moore was still on Los Angeles time.

Anyway, the winners of the 2007 Nebulas, presented by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, drumroll please…

Novels: Seeker, by Jack McDevitt

(Ace Books)

Novellas: "Burn," by James Patrick Kelly (podcast version)

(Tachyon Publications, Dec05)

Novelettes: "Two Hearts," by Peter S. Beagle

(F&SF, Oct/Nov05)

Short Stories: "Echo," by Elizabeth Hand

(F&SF, Oct/Nov05)

Scripts: Howl’s Moving Castle, by Hayao Miyazaki, Cindy Davis Hewitt, and Donald H. Hewitt

(Studio Ghibli and Walt Disney Pictures, U.S. Premier 10 Jun05. Based on the novel by Diana Wynne Jones.)

Andre Norton Award (Young Adult): Magic Or Madness, by Justine Larbalestier

(Penguin Razorbill, May05)

Congratulations to all the winners and nominees. More coverage later after some much needed sleep.

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